Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24

Thread: Lincolnshire Posy - Would Like Input/Opinions

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by RickF View Post
    I just spoke with my grandson who got to play Lincolnshire Posy (all 5 mvmnnts) with his H.S. band (Enloe Arts & Science HS in Raleigh, NC) last week. This is an excellent H.S. band. He said his dir asked him to play the solo with a baritone rather than his euph (YEP-641). He used a 'bent bell' baritone. He also mentioned that the dir gave him the hand a few times as he sounded louder than usual with a front facing bell and smaller bore horn. I forget his director's name but I understand he's very good and particular about their performances.
    The director at Enloe H.S. is Robert Hunter, who is a trumpet player, was a past conductor of the Triangle Wind Ensemble and was an Assistant Conductor of the Triangle Brass Band. He understands the euphonium and baritone, loves their sound, and is a very fine conductor -- it is not surprising that he would go for the most authentic interpretation of the piece.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,222
    Thanks John,
    I thought you knew him.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    Russian Christmas Music (Alfred Reed)
    El Cumbanchero (Rafael Hernández) cell phone video

  3. Quote Originally Posted by Snorlax View Post
    The edition we played had a wrong note in the bass-clef baritone part in a solo passage--an F instead of an E-flat (probably a failure to un-transpose properly from the TC version).
    I had this same experience, pretty prominent publisher, too.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Pnogard View Post
    I had this same experience, pretty prominent publisher, too.
    Do you recall where this occurs? I may be reading it in next week - thanks! In any event I am warned! - Carroll

  5. #15
    It occurs in the solo in Movement 4, "The Brisk Young Sailor." The highest note in the solo should be an Eb, not an F, as notated. It only occurs in the 2010 Fennell edition, in the bass clef baritone part. I think it is correct in the treble clef version. In any case, the highest note of the solo should be a concert Eb.


    Kyle Aufderhar

    1982 Besson Imperial 767 euphonium (Giddings and Webster Carbonaria)
    1966 Salvation Army Triumphonic baritone (Doug Elliott, LT 100 rim, F cup, F3xs shank)

    Lafayette Concert Band
    Acadian Wind Symphony
    University of Louisiana-Lafayette Wind Ensemble

  6. #16
    Thank you! - Carroll

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by K_Aufderhar View Post
    It occurs in the solo in Movement 4, "The Brisk Young Sailor." The highest note in the solo should be an Eb, not an F, as notated. It only occurs in the 2010 Fennell edition, in the bass clef baritone part. I think it is correct in the treble clef version. In any case, the highest note of the solo should be a concert Eb.
    We've done this piece recently in my ensemble. I recall hearing of this, and the correction being penciled in on the baritone horn part.

    Speaking of which, the person there who played the BH part IIRC was probably on a euphonium (I didn't pay much attention to his instrument, other than it was a shiny silver. Plus, up until I found this site, I didn't know what the different between a BH and euphonium was). AFAIK, he didn't have a "proper BH" available. Also, we skipped the 3rd and 5th movements (Rufford Park Poachers and Lord Melbourne respectively).

  8. #18
    I knew I would find the answer to me question in this thread!!

    I am preparing to play "Posy" with a band in March, and after learning from the old editions, the band purchased the Fennell "critical" edition parts and score. Of course, I noticed that "F" right away, and was wondering if that was a mistake in the critical edition. It's actually written that way in the score, and in the treble clef part as well.



    Quote Originally Posted by Snorlax View Post
    The Indiana Wind Symphony played Lincolnshire Posy last year with yours truly doing the baritone part on a Yamaha 621 3+1 non-compensating baritone and 6 1/2 AL mouthpiece. I'll see if I can find a recording. The director showed some of those original vocal versions before we played the piece, and it added quite a bit of understanding for both the audience and for the performers.

    The edition we played had a wrong note in the bass-clef baritone part in a solo passage--an F instead of an E-flat (probably a failure to un-transpose properly from the TC version). I didn't know the piece all that well before the IWS had its first rehearsal on it, and the entire band gasped en masse and about ground to a halt when they heard that note coming out of my bell at the rehearsal. ;-) They all KNEW the piece!!

  9. Hi all,

    I will be doing this in the next cycle with the Metropolitan Wind Symphony scheduled for a March 2019 performance. I will (of course) use my baritone. Thanks for the comments above. I will do my homework!

    Doug
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HS baritone
    New England Brass Band
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  10. Baritone = baritone in Grainger land

    I agree, the baritone part should be played on a baritone. I ran into an unelightened director who also insisted on having the part plated on a Euphonium. The sound quality is different and Grainger knew it.

    Mike Shannon

    Quote Originally Posted by bbocaner View Post
    I haven't gotten to play the baritone part, but I have played the euphonium part while someone else did it on euphonium, and I have played baritone on a number of other grainger pieces with the same instrumentation.

    I have heard second-hand that one prominent educator tells his students to do it on euphonium because that sounds best, but I couldn't disagree more.

    It absolutely MUST be done on baritone. Grainger was an amazing orchestrator and knew what he was doing. The blending with the horn section, trombone section, etc. in the baritone part is all over the piece, and it just doesn't work as well on euphonium. Euphonium is the usually the solo melody instrument, and baritone more of a background instrument, so for him to flip the roles around, he must've had a really good reason. If you listen to a folk singer do "the broken token" ( or also sometimes called "a pretty fair maiden" which is the real name for the movement that grainger calls the "brisk young sailor", which is a different fok song alltogether!), you'll understand why he put that melody in the baritone. It just fits.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •