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Thread: Help! I got a nasty dent In my Sterling euph :(

  1. #1

    Unhappy Help! I got a nasty dent In my Sterling euph :(

    Hi Everyone,
    I recently sent my Sterling euphonium to the factory in England to get my valve tops, caps and waterkeys goldplated (and the plating job is amazing btw),
    but when I got my instrument back this monday, I noticed a pretty large dent, assumably from the delivery proces (see the pictures below).

    Now this is my question:
    Is there any chance to get this repaired, swift and easy? I contacted a couple shops but no one was sure that the repairing proces wouldn't involve unsoldering, wich would damage the silverplating.
    Some suggested to get this back to the factory for repair and replating of that piece of my euph, but I already waited more than a month for the goldplating job, and there's the chance again that things like this will happen by the delivery

    Please respond if you have any suggestions or ideas!

    Many thanks!
    Vito
    Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,990
    That should be pretty easy to do -- depending on what you'll be satisfied with -- if you can get to the right repair tech. Since it's in the large diameter bottom bow, it's a perfect candidate for de-denting with the magnet/ball technique. I have done this with great success on my 1924 tuba (the one I'm holding in what is currently my avatar).

    The only wrinkle (no pun intended), is that the dent overlaps the area where the bottom bow guard is soldered on. It's POSSIBLE that the dent (or almost all of it) would come out without removing the guard. Otherwise, the guard would need to be unsoldered, the dent removed (magnet/ball) from the bottom bow, the dent removed from the guard, and then the guard soldered back on. But like I say, the right tech should be able to do this fairly straightforwardly. If you'd be satisfied with something maybe a little bit short of perfection (in terms of there maybe being some visible imperfection in the dented guard area) I'd guess this could be done without removing the guard.

    I don't see why unsoldering should damage the silver plating if you have someone who knows what he or she is doing. A lot of techs don't do the magnet/ball approach because the full sets of balls are so expensive, and they like to stick with traditional means.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  3. #3
    I live in Belgium and I'm afraid that there aren't many repair technicians who are familiar with the magnet/ball technique
    The ones that I informed said that the best way to repair it, was to unsolder the bottom bent completely, then unsolder the guard, dent both out and resolder it again (and replate the bottom bend as an option).
    I wouldn't care that it would not be 'perfect', I just want that dent out of my instrument
    Thanks for replying, I read your thread about the magnet/ball technique and I'm very curious about it, though I wouldn't try it out for the first time on my own euphonium
    Vito

  4. Quote Originally Posted by Vito View Post
    I live in Belgium and I'm afraid that there aren't many repair technicians who are familiar with the magnet/ball technique
    The ones that I informed said that the best way to repair it, was to unsolder the bottom bent completely, then unsolder the guard, dent both out and resolder it again (and replate the bottom bend as an option).
    I wouldn't care that it would not be 'perfect', I just want that dent out of my instrument
    Thanks for replying, I read your thread about the magnet/ball technique and I'm very curious about it, though I wouldn't try it out for the first time on my own euphonium
    Vito
    Vito,

    I noticed the overlap as well. I had a dent like that in the bottom bow of my Besson Prestige done with a magnetic ball. But my dent did not overlap the guard.

    I go to the International Brass Band Summer School (IBBSS) in Wales from the US each summer (first week of August). I normally arrange to visit Paul Riggett and the crew at the Sterling "factory" at Beeston, near Sandy, in Bedfordshire, UK. I usually arrange ahead of time to have specific work done on my horn (none needed in the last couple of years). I'd give Paul a call and see what he suggests. You could keep playing until you have time to go from Belgium to the UK. You can take the "Chunnel" direct to London, St. Pancras station and then change to a local train from St. Pancras direct to Sandy. Paul can come pick you up. Maybe if you offer to buy a beer or dinner, you can have a great time. His local band rehearses Tues/Thurs evenings!

    Doug
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HS baritone & Conn 24I/25I euphonium
    New England Brass Band/Metropolitan Wind Symphony
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  5. #5
    the magnetic ball technique can roughly knock out a dent, but it's not going to get it perfect. Especially not with the guard overlap.

    it is impossible to do undetectable soldering on a silver plated instrument. You will always be able to see the solder line. Some of the best techs can get it really close, but it will never be absolutely perfect unless you have the whole instrument replated.

    It's unfortunate, but your best bet is to have the very best tech you can find do their very best job.
    --
    Barry

  6. #6
    Hmm, such a shame... I'll try to find someone with experience in the magnet/ball technique, I don't want to get my euph back to 'perfect', I just want that dent out.
    Last edited by Vito; 02-12-2016 at 07:37 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Texas, where every thing is bigger & BETTER
    Posts
    132
    If you can't find a dependable tech than I would just leave the dent alone. I'm not convinced the ball/magnet technique would work effectively for your situation. I think the most effective way to get that dent out would be to unsolder the bow and use a curved rod to get it out. However, like stated above, the unsoldering of the bow will leave some cosmetic imperfection.
    Yamaha 642s Neo

  8. Vito,

    I am exactly suggesting that you contact Paul Riggett at Sterling directly and arrange a factory "tour" for you and your horn. Connecting through Nick Ost is a great idea. I have also PM'd Paul already on his Facebook site regarding your issue..

    Doug
    Last edited by davewerden; 02-12-2016 at 08:09 AM.
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HS baritone & Conn 24I/25I euphonium
    New England Brass Band/Metropolitan Wind Symphony
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  9. #9
    Thanks for asking Paul about my probleem, I appreciate your help!
    Last edited by Vito; 02-12-2016 at 08:32 AM.

  10. #10
    Vito, since you live in Belgium: Adams prouds itself in repair: http://www.adams-music.com/repair/bl...nten/?lid=1043 I'd give them a mail or a phonecall.

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