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Thread: FS: Adams E1 .60 in Lacquer with Gold Brass Bell - Demo Horn

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by CEBunker View Post
    Est Feb 4th delivery. I won't sleep well until then.
    Patience is a virtue! Hang tough.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by CEBunker View Post
    1) Can't believe I did it, 2) really can't believe my wife agreed to it, and 3) now looking for a used dog house, preferably with heat installed! ACB offered a great deal when I called them, I couldn't pass it up. Went through the eBay link here, so hope you get that percentage for the forum.

    I think I am now forever done buying euphoniums!
    You only THINK you're done buying euphoniums. Once the bug has bitten...
    Sterling Virtuoso Euphonium, Denis Wick 4AL

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat View Post
    You only THINK you're done buying euphoniums. Once the bug has bitten...
    Don't warn him!! He'll find out soon enough.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  4. #14
    Two things come to mind... it's good my wife can't log in here and 'with friends like these! '
    Chris Bunker
    Adams E1, Wick 4AL

  5. #15
    Preparation:

    Remember that the Adams horns work well because the design lets the whole instrument resonant to help "encourage" the sound. So as you play it, don't try to force the sound out. You and the horn need to cooperate in the deal. I find that when I'm blowing it with a good center and good support, I can feel the instrument vibrate in my left hand. Not sure if that would be as true of the heavier metal, but it is with my .60. Once you get used to the concept, you'll find you are not having to work as hard to project your sound.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by CEBunker View Post
    Two things come to mind... it's good my wife can't log in here and 'with friends like these! '
    Um, it's only fair to let you know that a person does not have to log in to see the thread!

    Seriously, though, I think this horn will thoroughly satisfy your need in the "good horn" area. I'm really happy for you.

    (Now you can focus on the fringes, like baritones and double-bell euphoniums. Sorry... I couldn't resist one more!)
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  7. #17
    Is that the indication of 'resonance' then - the feeling of actual vibration? I am really looking forward to playing it.
    Chris Bunker
    Adams E1, Wick 4AL

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by CEBunker View Post
    Is that the indication of 'resonance' then - the feeling of actual vibration? I am really looking forward to playing it.
    I'm not stating this as a scientist or acoustical engineer. That's how it feels, though, and it seems to make sense as a theory. But it is too simplistic to explain how the horn actually does it's thing. You can make a horn thin and give it too little bracing and it will also vibrate in your hands, but it won't convert that to projection. I think it has to do with the consistency and progression of vibration within the horn, so waves are forwarded to the bell end. On a too-thin cheaply-made horn, the vibrations are not at all controlled and may actually lessen the projection.

    I think the one thing I've found consistenly is that I can play the horn incorrectly and not get that vibration, in which case I don't sound as good. When I get the vibration it's because I'm doing other "good" stuff like using a good air stream and centering the pitches in my chops instead of making the horn force them into place. The reason I have to pay attention to this is that I STILL retain some habits from playing for decades on horns where I needed to bend pitches more. On most notes on my horn I just need to plant to pitch where my musical mind tells me it should be, rather than where muscle memory thinks it should be.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  9. #19
    Also, I have acquired a number of study books, but to keep it fresh and fun, I have started buying solo pieces. Just got 'Call of the Seasons' because it sounded very nice, seems to have some parts I can play, and has lots of parts that will require lots of work. I would like to get your arrangement 'Two Holst Songs' but it doesn't appear to be in treble clef. It's like Christmas again.
    Chris Bunker
    Adams E1, Wick 4AL

  10. #20
    Gosh don't mention baritones! I spent my whole high school career thinking I was a baritone player! I have thought about getting one just to fix that mistake; but not right now!!!
    Chris Bunker
    Adams E1, Wick 4AL

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