Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Thread: valve oil ?

  1. valve oil ?

    not sure is this is the right section for this question but here i go anyways. What is the best brand of valve oil to use on my horn?



    Thanks
    holly

  2. #2
    If you ask me... Blue Juice. (But we'll get other answers, I'm sure!)

    http://www.amazon.com/Blue-Juice-BJ2...rds=blue+juice

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	41gFF1G3WFL._AA160_.jpg 
Views:	1 
Size:	4.3 KB 
ID:	3559
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  3. I have tried many oils on my Prestige 2052 but have found Blue Juice very good. La Tromba is also one I would recommend, its the choice of David Childs.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,218
    Another vote here for Blue Juice. I've tried many brands - Al Cass Fast, Alysin, Binak, Hetmans and Yamaha synthetic. Blue Juice does the job without creating any nasty yellow buildup that some synthetics create.

    YMMV
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    Russian Christmas Music (Alfred Reed)
    El Cumbanchero (Rafael Hernández) cell phone video

  5. Like many, I've tried a large assortment of valve oils and settled on the juice, Blue Juice that is!
    Bob Tampa FL USA
    Euph -- 1984 B&H Round Stamp Sovereign 967 / 1978 Besson NS 767 / Early 90s Sterling MP: 4AL and GW Carbonaria
    Tuba -- 2014 Wisemann 900 CC / 2013 Mack 410 MP: Blokepiece Symphony American Shank and 33.2 #2 Rim

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    2,031
    If you look on this board at other threads on this subject, I believe that you'll discover that you can view the responses as falling into two groups:

    1. The best valve oil is a "natural" (petroleum) oil.
    2. The best valve oil is a synthetic oil.

    For each of these, there then appears to be a kind of consensus (not universal or even overwhelming, but fairly general):

    A. The best natural valve oil is Blue Juice.
    B. The best synthetic valve oil is one of the Yamaha synthetic valve oils.

    So a reasonable approach might be to buy a bottle of the Blue Juice and a bottle of (the appropriate) Yamaha synthetic valve oil and try each. If you do that you should thoroughly clean your valves when you switch from one to the other. And you'll probably want to switch back and forth a few times to be sure what the result is (if you notice any difference). This experiment at least gives you experience with two different and highly regarded valve oils, but requires that you only try two.

    In the case of the Yamaha, "appropriate" depends on you're instrument and how worn it is. If it's fairly old and the valves are pretty well used, then the Medium version may be the best choice. If it's new or has tight tolerances in the valves, then the Light would probably be the best choice. If it's REALLY old/worn, then the Vintage may do the trick for you.

    A lot of this turns out to be personal preference and -- it appears -- personal chemistry interacting with the valve oil. There is no single "right" answer, and there is likely no single "best" valve oil -- even for a given player on a given instrument.

    The two euphonium players who sit near me in community band both use Blue Juice. I use Yamaha Light Synthetic Valve Oil on my Mack Brass euph and my Wessex tuba. I use the Vintage oil on my 1924 tuba. The tuba player who sits to my left uses, I think, whatever valve oil she happens to have or have scrounged from her daughter.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by ghmerrill View Post
    The tuba player who sits to my left uses, I think, whatever valve oil she happens to have or have scrounged from her daughter.
    I'm a big proponent of this method of choosing a valve oil. If the oil makes the valve go down smoothly and return quickly then it's a 10 in my book! So far they've all worked fine. Haven't tried a synthetic yet though.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Leadwood, MO
    Posts
    541
    Quote Originally Posted by RickF View Post
    Another vote here for Blue Juice. I've tried many brands - Al Cass Fast, Alysin, Binak, Hetmans and Yamaha synthetic. Blue Juice does the job without creating any nasty yellow buildup that some synthetics create.

    YMMV
    Blue Juice for me as well! Works well, lasts quite a while.
    John 3:16

    Yamaha YSL-630 Trombone
    Conn 15I Euphonium
    Mack Brass Euphonium
    Conn Victor 5H Trombone
    Yamaha 354 Trombone
    Mack Brass 200S BBb Tuba

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    2,031
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveP View Post
    I'm a big proponent of this method of choosing a valve oil. If the oil makes the valve go down smoothly and return quickly then it's a 10 in my book! So far they've all worked fine. Haven't tried a synthetic yet though.
    Of course she plays a rotary valve tuba. In my experience, piston instruments are a lot more sensitive to the oil used -- in large part because of the valve tolerances and the fact that in piston instruments the valve surfaces are actually subject to wear.

    Here are what I think are the major considerations in choosing a valve oil:

    1. Viscosity (not too thin; not too thick)
    2. Odor/taste (some people aren't bothered by the taste and smell of petroleum products -- even kerosene; others are)
    3. Color/staining (most petroleum oils stain or color anything they get on; synthetics don't seem to)
    4. Time required between applications (and your belief about this; in general the "natural" oils seem to wash off significantly more quickly than the synthetics)
    5. Build-up, gunk, slime, etc. (no one seems to like this; there is wide variance among players on which oils result in these things and on which instruments)
    6. Ease of acquisition (some people like to buy it in a music store -- if you can find one; others are fine with internet purchases)
    7. Cost (synthetics tend to be more expensive; Blue Juice is about half the cost of Yamaha synthetic oil; but I don't know what the difference in time between application is; some people like to go real cheap and mix their own from ultrapure lamp oil -- which is kerosene -- and motor oil)
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  10. #10
    My philosophy has always been to use natural valve oil if it works for the horn before turning to a synthetic. The only instrument I'm using a synthetic on right now is my Kanstul Euphonium, which is brand new and still has very tight valves. Everything else gets Al Cass or Bill's Best (for fussy older valves).
    Adrian L. Quince
    Composer, Conductor, Euphoniumist
    www.adrianquince.com

    Kanstul 976 - SM4U

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •