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Thread: Treble, Bass, how and when to learn which for the Euphonium

  1. #1

    Treble, Bass, how and when to learn which for the Euphonium

    I am just beginning on the Euphonium (4 - key) . I play other (non-brass) instruments in treble clef, so started learning with TC music.

    But now I am wondering if I have made it more challenging in the long run by sticking to TC? The online instruction I have been able to find is through the Music Professor website, and that is in BC. (I hope to get Skype lessons soon, but our sole rural Internet provider is so slow that's not yet practical.)

    Other than TubaChristmas once a year, I don't see much of an opportunity for me to practice/play Euphonium with other musicians for the foreseeable future. For those of you with an active community band, enjoy it for me! For those of you in school or university bands, double that.

    So, recommendations on learning the instrument in either bass or treble clef would be appreciated, along with the rationale for each.

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    If you can learn to play from bass clef music, that would be good. But there is a fair amount of treble clef music out there for euphonium or baritone. I play treble clef myself in a community band. I would say that about 80% of the music we get is in both clefs.

    Welcome to the beautiful tenor voice of euphonium.
    Rick Floyd
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  3. If you already know the fingerings for euph in treble clef after playing trumpet, then you should focus on bass clef.
    Willson 2960TA
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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by GigaOrion View Post
    If you already know the fingerings for euph in treble clef after playing trumpet, then you should focus on bass clef.
    Didn't play trumpet, but the fingerings as follows seemed to be what I remembered from high school E-flat alto horn -- G & C were open, A & E were 1&2, F was 1, B was 2 for example. (No fourth valve for D on the Alto horn, la.)

    I am trying to switch mental gears so that I am reading bass clef with bass cleft fingerings, instead of "translating" the written music into treble clef in my head and then transposing the fingerings. Not a good explanation, but frustrating because my brain & fingers keep defaulting to treble instead of seeing bass. Nothing like looking at the Music Professor online lessons for bass clef, and having a brain freeze when trying to remember what note I am looking at on BC. It's not that I can't remember that F is the fourth line from the bottom, it's making the letter in my head match to the visual on the page. Ack.
    I need to work hard to be bi-cleftual.


    Surprised that the alto horn fingerings are so hardwired when I only played for three years decades ago, but that three hours a day is imbedded in long-term memory.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by RickF View Post
    If you can learn to play from bass clef music, that would be good. But there is a fair amount of treble clef music out there for euphonium or baritone. I play treble clef myself in a community band. I would say that about 80% of the music we get is in both clefs.

    Welcome to the beautiful tenor voice of euphonium.
    Thanks for the detailed background info and your kind welcome. Both are much appreciated. I really am liking the sound of the Euphonium (even the sounds I am making) and enjoy it. The dogs say it is much more pleasant to listen to me practice than my other instruments….

  6. #6
    It sounds like your alto fingerings are the same as treble clef euphonium, so that should get you off to an easy start. There is a lot of material in treble clef. I would exploit that at first, but add in bass clef as the mood strikes you.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
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  7. #7
    When the time is right this blog post might help you get started on bass clef:

    http://www.dwerden.com/forum/entry.p...Clef-Euphonium
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  8. #8
    you'll need both, so start working on both.


  9. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by cognitofalcon View Post
    Thanks for your suggestion, I appreciate it.

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