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Thread: Doubling/Triple on Instruments

  1. Quote Originally Posted by ghmerrill View Post
    On the other hand, I don't really consider the tuba to be a true "orchestral instrument"
    One of the reasons I ventured over to the dark side of Tuba was to be able to participate in the beauty of orchestral music. Leading the orchestra this series from the bottom up on Finlandia makes it all worthwhile. Considering the inevitable downtime, playing with an orchestra may not be the way to build chops but building them elsewhere in other ways allows you to enter the orchestral experience ready to make a sizeable contribution when called upon. For you, I second the idea of embracing the slide!
    Bob Tampa FL USA
    Euph -- 1984 B&H Round Stamp Sovereign 967 / 1978 Besson NS 767 / Early 90s Sterling MP: 4AL and GW Carbonaria
    Tuba -- 2014 Wisemann 900 CC / 2013 Mack 410 MP: Blokepiece Symphony American Shank and 33.2 #2 Rim

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Smoketown, Pa
    Posts
    208
    Personally I feel that learning the trombone is the way to go, especially at your age. I played Euphonium in HS switching from cornet and then majored on Euphonium in college with 2 semesters or was it 1? on trombone. (It was a Mt. Vernon Bach belonging to a frat brother) After all these many years reaching retirement I decided to play in the church ensemble and ended up playing trombone parts on the Euphonium. Decided to look for a used bone and bought a 1977 Bach 42 with F Attachment. When joining community bands, there were more euphoniums then needed so I ended up on the trombone. Not only that but 1st in the one band. The 42 was ok but presented problems on ease of playing etc. To make a long story short, bought a B&S tenor with F attachment and now looking for a bass bone for the other band and stage band. That's why I'm selling off my old euphoniums to make way for the trombone. Still playing euphonium at church with the trio Conn 88H, Euphonium and Tuba. Man what a blend of sound. Just trying to relate my experience to your selection.

  3. Being primarily a tubaist, (and a serious euphonium doubler) I would advocate for that instrument. The larger mouthpiece, necessitates a somewhat different embouchure, in that there will be considerable muscle tissue that has not yet been employed as when playing euph. For lack of a better description, that "doughnut" of tissue is now being strengthened and will provide a good solid foundation on which to rest the euph mp.

    Playing on the tuba, with a much broader air stream may also help open the throat and contribute to more depth of sound on the euph. I notice that after playing tuba, I have a relatively huge capacity for filling the euph and playing nice long phrases. As Dave mentioned, it is good for building the wind. My challenge is to not overblow and to focus the wind on making an appropriate sound (feeding the buzz) over an intelligent phrase structure. It is nice to be stronger than the task at hand.

    Success in this area all depends of course, if you are approaching the tuba with a proper understanding of its breathing concepts, the buzz and keeping the throat and oral cavity open. Playing tuba is a 'concept' in which many aspects are not as simple as they appear.
    It is more than just an octave below the euph. In general, with regard to the wind, think 'Slower' and 'Bigger' and anticipate every note you play.

    But I also love the bass trombone and it is the 'logical double' these days for the tuba (It used to be the acoustic double bass)
    The tuba shares the same problem with the euphonium in that there are few serious gigs outside of the band. Though the tuba does have a fair amount of material in the orchestra, dixieland and quintet.

    But remember when you are working with instruments of different size mouthpieces, try not to neglect your principal instrument.
    There is really no damage to occur, but one embouchure may take over as dominant and the other not seem as familiar as it used to.

    So for building chops, I vote for the tuba. For learning a double that will offer more gigs, certainly the bass trombone.
    If you have the time and resources, eventually do them all. I do, and I love it. Heck, this past year I even got myself a Cimbasso (valved contrabass trombone) Now there is one ax that is hard to find groups in which to play. But it is fun for 'cross training.'
    BMB F tuba 445s
    BMB CC (BAT) 865s
    Mack Euphonium 1150s
    Wessex F Cimbasso

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    2,035
    If I had the money right now, I'd definitely buy a Cimbasso (preferably in Eb). I've actually thought of making one, but even getting the parts together is pretty expensive unless you take a really long-term view and get lucky on Tubnet and Ebay. And the Chinese ones are still a bit pricey unless you buy direct from a Chinese distributor, handle all the import stuff, and take the chance on getting one that's damaged or poorly fabricated. Still .... very tempting.

    If I had one, I figure I'd just show up in community band and play the bass trombone parts with it.

    If only I could find a cheap 9.5" or larger bass trombone bell, ......... I'm thinking that building an Eb Cimbasso with five valves (three on right hand and two on left) would just be insufferably cool.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  5. #15
    I think that tuba makes my euphonium playing better, and euphonium makes my tuba playing better... as long as I devote enough practice time to both!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    El Paso, Texas
    Posts
    383
    I'm with Pat. I've played around on tuba before college, but last semester I actually got serious about it and started taking lessons(luckily my professor is proficient in both) and it is was an easy transfer for me. Started on BBb last semester and no I am getting to learn CC this semester. My high range on tuba is excellent, but the low range is a work in progress. It helps a lot with air support and being able to time good breaths in good/as good as possible places. For me trombone just was an interest and therefore when I tried it I did not do very well because I had no desire. Tuba was a different situation. I had a passion to get good at it and asked a lot of necessary questions, some stupid ones too, but I caught on fast because I wanted to.

    Long story short, do what makes you happy, and work until you get what you want and then work harder to keep what you have earned. Trombone seems to be the route that might suit your desires, but tuba is also a good option, but there are less spots because there are simply less parts compared to a trombone section.
    Adams E1 SS, Gold Brass Body .6mm DE Euph N103 Jcup, J9 shank
    Meinl Weston 2141 Eb Tuba PT 84

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    2,035
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat View Post
    I think that tuba makes my euphonium playing better, and euphonium makes my tuba playing better... as long as I devote enough practice time to both!
    Absolutely agreed. Using them both has taught me a lot about embouchure.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  8. Thanks everyone for your thoughts! While I can't respond to everyone of your posts specifically due to time restraints (I would if I could) your conglomeration of ideas and thoughts have given me a clearer idea on how to get better as brass instrumentalist in general.

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