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Thread: Tuba Exchange 2052sg Tuning issue

  1. Tuba Exchange 2052sg Tuning issue

    Moved by Moderator to the Euphonium Brands Section

    So I bought a new compensating Euphonium from a local Tuba/Euphonium dealer called The Tuba Exchange. The Euphonium sounds wonderful. When I went to visit the dealer they had me compare this euphonium with other compensating and non compensating Euphoniums, and even had me compare it with the Jupiter XO Euphonium that costs almost twice as much as this Euphonium. Well I soon learned that price does not always mean that something is better because in my honest opinion the $2,690 Euphonium sound better than the $5000+ Euphonium, and by better I mean the sound was more open and clear but it still retained the dark warm sound. So i went with the TE- 2052 sg and i love it but I've had a problem with tuning. Its REALLY sharp. Its so sharp that i have unscrew the tuning trigger to the point where the screw almost comes off and press the trigger almost all the way down for it to be in tune. Is it common for new instruments to be this sharp? Will I have to break it in more for it to stay in tune? Or is it something wrong with the horn and I'm going to have to take it back and get someone to look at it for me? I've only had it for 5 days so hopefully its just something that requires some breaking in. But i rather hear from experience than to just assume.
    Last edited by daruby; 09-17-2014 at 08:33 PM.

  2. #2
    No, that is not common. But you need to make sure it's the horn and not you or your mouthpiece. What mouthpiece are you using? And what horn did you previously play?

    It IS somewhat common if you switch from a small to a large horn to not play the new horn "correctly" - by which I mean to use the airstream the horn needs and to relax your embouchure to true pitch.

    The quickest test is to find an experienced player to check it, especially someone who is used to a compensating euphonium. If that is not possible, then try to relax your sound and your chops as you play. Keep the corners of your mouth "set" (not pulled out beyond their normal position when not playing and not smiling), and make sure you are not pushing your upper & lower lips together too tightly. Think of using "warm" air, like a garden hose with the nozzle open, producing a "wide" stream instead of the narrow stream you get as you tighten the nozzle. It is barely possible you are (subconsciously) trying to get the sound of a previous smaller horn while using the new larger horn.

    See this post for more suggestions on assessing intonation:
    http://www.dwerden.com/forum/entry.p...ing-Intonation

    The odds are that your horn is OK, but you should check it out while you still have return rights!
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
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  3. I used to play on a Yamaha yep 321 with a schilke 51 standard small shank. I now play on a schilke 52 D large shank.

  4. #4
    Then the new mouthpiece should be a good fit and should not by itself be causing sharpness. Switching from a 321 to a large compensating horn (and bigger mouthpiece) could cause you to blow the new horn incorrectly, so that theory I mentioned is still in play. Is there someone accessible to you who could try the new horn (with your new mouthpiece, preferably)?
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Afranco96 View Post
    So I bought a new compensating Euphonium from a local Tuba/Euphonium dealer called The Tuba Exchange. [snip] So i went with the TE- 2052 sg and i love it but I've had a problem with tuning. Its REALLY sharp.
    I see that Tuba Exchange sells a compensating horn with the model number 1150, which is the JinBao model number (Wessex, Mack Brass, etc.). The model 2052 doesn't match anything I saw on the Jin Bao web site (it's a Besson model number, so I guess it's a clone of the Besson) I'm not sure which factory makes it--if it were Jin Bao, the intonation should be comparable to the Wessex model with the trigger, the Dolce Cantabile, which David already tested.

    I think David's suggestion of having another player test it is a good one. If the other player has the same experience as you, I would take it up with the vendor--the horn may have to be exchanged (no pun intended).
    Dean L. Surkin
    Mack Brass MACK-EU1150S, BB1, Kadja, and DE 101XTG9 mouthpieces
    Bach 36B trombone; pBone; Vincent Bach (from 1971) 6.5AL mouthpiece
    Steinway 1902 Model A, restored by AC Pianocraft in 1988; Kawai MP8, Yamaha KX-76
    See my avatar: Jazz (the black cockapoo) and Delilah (the cavapoo puppy) keep me company while practicing

  6. Thank you so David! I got my Euphonium teacher to give it a shot today at my lesson and it was just the switch from a smaller to larger Euph. Thank you for the help!

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