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Thread: FS Adams Euph

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Oklahoma City
    Posts
    263

    FS Adams Euph

    Not entirely sure which model or options
    But Tuba Exchange is selling a silver plated Adams Euphonium Demo
    http://www.tubaexchange.com/euphoniu...er-plated-bell
    Marco Santos - Marcher and Performer
    Guardians Drum & Bugle Corps 2015
    Blue Knights Drum & Bugle Corps 2016, 20i7, 2018

    Adams E1
    Modified Schilke 52E2 by Justin Gorodetzky

  2. I emailed them to inquire about this instrument. At first they had a picture of a silver-bell Adams which did not match the description.

    It is the .50mm thickness, entirely silver plated, and they said it had no dents or defects. I think it is a good buy.

    However, it was fortunate (or maybe unfortunate?) timing in that another customer had just returned a .60 mm horn with the silver bell. Of course it was more expensive, but the people at Tuba Exchange seemed really nice to work with, and overcome with delusions of adequacy I bought it. I don't have it yet but it should be on the way from North Carolina. I am really looking forward to it.

  3. #3
    Congratulations on the purchase! I hope it arrives soon so you can dig right in. Let us know how it goes.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  4. Great decision! You only go around once in life Here's to many enjoyable years of elevated tooting mojo -- grins!
    Bob Tampa FL USA
    Euph -- 1984 B&H Round Stamp Sovereign 967 / 1978 Besson NS 767 / Early 90s Sterling MP: 4AL and GW Carbonaria
    Tuba -- 2014 Wisemann 900 CC / 2013 Mack 410 MP: Blokepiece Symphony American Shank and 33.2 #2 Rim

  5. Thanks! I am pretty pumped about it. I had a little trouble justifying a top of the line instrument for an amateur like me but Bob makes a good point. I do intend to share my impressions from an amateur's point of view. I will never part with my old Besson and I really like the sound, etc. but I do find it frustrating not being able to play certain notes in tune. I am hoping the Adams will help with that and also provide a boost to my tooting mojo in general. More to come...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,338
    Congratulations Daniel! I felt the same way as you when I purchased a new horn last year. Hard to justify sometimes.

    Let us know your impressions once you become familiar with your new horn.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    Russian Christmas Music (Alfred Reed)
    El Cumbanchero (Rafael Hernández) cell phone video

  7. #7
    Of course value (i.e. $$$) is always a personal decision. There are some pros who just like their old horns and don't buy newer ones, even though their playing level would seem to justify it. If anyone wants to try to justify it in business terms, they will be hard put to do so. Will a pro start making more money if he gets a little better horn? Probably not. A better horn might make his job easier and might allow him to stretch some performance ideas, but that's not exactly a measurable ROI situation.

    For an amateur, your primary reason for playing is not making money. In fact, if you play in a brass band (and some community bands) you actually pay for the privilege. So there is no ROI in monetary terms. HOWEVER, there is an unmeasurable but still very real ROI if you count personal satisfaction and fun.

    Suppose you're not the best player in the world, or maybe not the best player in your local band. If you compare a horn like the Adams to an old horn you are now playing (possibly something like a Yamaha 321 or even an old Besson), the new horn will make it easier for you to get notes out consistently and will play them better in tune inherently. Any that are out of tune will require much less work to correct once you are used to the horn. And the tone might be better, and it will almost certainly be more consistent across the range of the instrument. Aren't those worthwhile improvements? Surely they give you a return on your investment in the realm of satisfaction and the joy of making music.

    So each of us must decide if the investment is worth it, and that decision is not usually based on a dollar-based ROI. If buying a new horn can make you sound X% better immediately, it's worth something. And if you are gradually getting better through diligent practice, but the new horn puts you a year or two ahead in your development, it's worth something.

    The key in my mind to anyone's decision is not their playing ability. It is their appreciation ability. If you can appreciate the difference, that's what counts. All you have to decide is how easily you can afford it.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  8. #8
    I own a lot of very expensive instruments. Recently someone challenged me to prove that my $13,000 Thein bass trumpet was 26 times better than their $500 chinese instrument. I went over how I liked the tone better, how it was easier to play, how the intonation was much better, how I felt the valves were smoother -- but I had to concede that this didn't amount to 26 times better. But what I was able to say is that all of these marginal improvements led me to enjoy playing the instrument more and feel less frustrated with it, and that led to me practicing a lot more and improving my playing a lot more than I ever would if I only owned the $500 instrument.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by bbocaner View Post
    I own a lot of very expensive instruments. Recently someone challenged me to prove that my $13,000 Thein bass trumpet was 26 times better than their $500 chinese instrument. I went over how I liked the tone better, how it was easier to play, how the intonation was much better, how I felt the valves were smoother -- but I had to concede that this didn't amount to 26 times better. But what I was able to say is that all of these marginal improvements led me to enjoy playing the instrument more and feel less frustrated with it, and that led to me practicing a lot more and improving my playing a lot more than I ever would if I only owned the $500 instrument.
    That pretty well parallels how I feel about my Jinbao euph. I would estimate that it's about 90% of the Yamaha original, but at less that 20% of the cost. If I had the disposable $$$, I would get an Adams, but if I hadn't read about the Jinbaos here in these forums and decided to take a chance, I'd still be stuck with my 90-year-old Conn.

    BTW, I'm going to be testing a Jinbao bass trumpet at IET at the end of the month, and if I like it, I'm going to buy it
    David Bjornstad

    1923 Conn New Wonder 86I, Bach 6 1/2 AL
    2018 Wessex EP100 Dolce, Denis Wick 4ABL
    2013 Jinbao JBEP-1111L, Denis Wick 4AM
    2015 Jinbao JBBR-1240, Denis Wick clone mouthpiece of unknown designation
    Cullman (AL) Community Band (Euph Section Leader)
    Brass Band of Huntsville (2nd Bari)

  10. This thread has meandered a long ways off of the original topic, and I will take the blame for the misdirection. bbocaner I had to laugh at the "26 times better challenge". Dave, you did a good job of expressing some of my thoughts about this. This isn't really a practical or business decision in any way. Music is my hobby and it is something I enjoy and get a sense of satisfaction from. I expect that a shiny new horn will help me to play better and therefore get more enjoyment out of it, so it definitely has value to me. I do think there is a little bit of practicality in that a high quality instrument will retain value over the years, unlike an inexpensive instrument which I would think would be very difficult to resell given that brand new (and possibly improved) instruments of similar quality are available at a low price.

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