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Thread: Tenor Tuba in Holst "Planets"

  1. #21
    Back to the Planets Tenor Tuba part. In Uranus, you may have already realized there is a typo in measure 139. the written dotted half note C should be a B. It should be in octaves with the tuba. On the last note of Jupiter I always like to play the final quarter note written D (concert C) up an octave like the rest of the orchestra.

    MJL

  2. I recently performed Mars with the Alabama Symphony, and it is an experience like nothing else. My heart was in my throat for those first octave G leaps.
    Martin Cochran
    Adams Performing Artist
    mceuph75@gmail.com

  3. #23
    Martin, I have felt that in rehearsal. There are a few measures to play before the leaps, but you have got to do them essentially cold -- no warmup, just play them. I am sure you nailed them, and I hope that I will do the same in concert.

    John

  4. #24
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    There are a few measures to play before the leaps, but you have got to do them essentially cold
    Reminds me of the "Trumpet Voluntary" (Clarke) being played after the wedding ceremony when bride and groom process out of the church. The trumpet player is pretty cold then.
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  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkLRVA View Post
    Back to the Planets Tenor Tuba part. In Uranus, you may have already realized there is a typo in measure 139. the written dotted half note C should be a B. It should be in octaves with the tuba. On the last note of Jupiter I always like to play the final quarter note written D (concert C) up an octave like the rest of the orchestra.

    MJL
    Right. Good to note that, prevents crunches!
    Last edited by JTJ; 02-23-2014 at 12:29 PM.

  6. #26
    I got to play this once, but my orchestra didn't want to hire a euph player, so I covered both parts on tuba and euphonium. The hardest part was not going back and forth between the two sizes of mouthpiece, it was going from concert pitch bass clef to transposed treble clef. I just covered whichever part I thought was more important at the time, which means when the euph actually does have a part, I played the notes.

  7. #27
    Been great to read these comments.

    Iím playing The Planets in the iconic Salisbury Cathedral next week with the cities Symphony Orchestra & Choir.

    Only have one rehearsal before Saturdays concert.

    Any further tips for those that have experience of playing this?

    Tone - straighter?? Iím from a wind band/brass band tradition (former Royal Marine Musician). Vibrato - what are peopleís thiughts?

    Dynamic makings - take them as read? Is a FFF really a full blooded FFF? etc etc.

    Many thanks,
    John
    Southampton, UK

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by johnat@talk21.com View Post
    Dynamic makings - take them as read? Is a FFF really a full blooded FFF? etc etc.
    Dynamics depend a little on your placement. If your bell is pointed toward the audience, then your job is easier. But if you are pointed at a right angle or to the rear of the ensemble, you probably have to really pump it out. Even in concert halls, but ESPECIALLY in a cathedral, separate the repeated quarter notes in Mars because they will sound like one long note otherwise. I do this mostly by putting a lot of attack followed by a quick taper on each note, rather than actually cutting the note off.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
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  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by 58mark View Post
    I got to play this once, but my orchestra didn't want to hire a euph player, so I covered both parts on tuba and euphonium. The hardest part was not going back and forth between the two sizes of mouthpiece, it was going from concert pitch bass clef to transposed treble clef. I just covered whichever part I thought was more important at the time, which means when the euph actually does have a part, I played the notes.
    Well 20 years later... we are playing it again, but this time I volunteered to play Euphonium instead of tuba. Just got done looking at the part....

    I am 20 years older and not in as good a shape I was when I was 30. I need to practice

    I can hit the notes, but endurance might be an issue. Lots of high notes, especially at the end

  10. #30
    "Mars, The Bringer of War" especially is a time to shine. Well done with the assignment and hope it goes well!
    U.S. Army, Retired (built mid-1950s)
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    Boosey & Co. Imperial Euph (built 1941)
    Edwards B454 Bass Trombone (built 2012)
    Boosey & Hawkes Imperial Eb tuba (built 1958)
    Kanstul 33-T lBBb tuba (built 2010)

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