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Thread: Wick mouthpiece comparisons

  1. #1
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    Dec 2011
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    Wick mouthpiece comparisons

    One of the interesting/frustrating facets of the information made available by Denis Wick Products for their mouthpieces is the variability in its details and completeness. There is the official "mouthpiece chart" (which comes in the box when you buy a mouthpiece and is also available online), and then there are other "sources" in which the information is slightly different -- and sometimes enlightening. Since I've been looking at these things recently (with respect to tuba mouthpieces), I offer the following in case others might benefit from it.

    The official product chart is here: http://www.deniswick.com/images/stor...risonChart.pdf.

    A "mouthpiece performance guide" for trumpet and trombone mouthpieces (and hence of interest for those euphonium players who use or are contemplating use of mouthpieces such as the 4AL, 4B, 3AL, etc.) is here: http://dansr.com/files/wickfiles/Mpc...ide_1760DB.pdf. It offers a nice visual comparison of the relative sizes/performance (in some vague sense) among Wick, Bach, and Schilke.

    A "Tuba Mouthpiece Chart" is here: http://dansr.com/files/wickfiles/Wick_catalog_2008.pdf. Note that the descriptions differ in various ways from those on the official product chart. In particular, the 2SL is described as a "German-style cup" even though this (rather important) description is missing from the product chart. Since the 2L is NOT a German-style cup, but a Helleberg, it is quite peculiar that this difference is not noted on the product chart. This means that the 2SL is a VERY different mouthpiece from the 2L -- and in fact that they are different in almost every way .

    A very interesting chart created by Stephen Wick for the tuba mouthpieces is here: http://dansr.com/files/wickfiles/Tub...tephenWick.pdf. It differs in a number of ways from both the product chart and the Tuba Mouthpiece Chart, and in addition contains some valuable characterizations by an expert who has used all of these mouthpieces. These provide some insight into what differences in performance you may expect among the different models.

    Most of the information I've focused on pertains to tuba mouthpieces. If anyone has found similar additional information (modulo Dave's very nice chart that is much broader in comparing across different brands as well), particularly concerning euphonium mouthpieces, I'd like to see it.
    Gary Merrill
    Wessex EEb Bass tuba (Denis Wick 3XL)
    Mack Brass Compensating Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J9 euph)
    Amati Oval Euph (DE N106, Euph J, J6 euph)
    1924 Buescher 3-valve Eb tuba, modified Kelly 25
    Schiller American Heritage 7B clone bass trombone (DE LB K/K9/112 Lexan, Brass Ark MV50R)
    1947 Olds "Standard" trombone (Olds #3)

  2. #2
    One mouthpiece specification that seems to be ignored is its weight. I've measured the weight of three "4" size mouthpieces:

    Wick 4 Heritage 4.3 oz
    Wick 4AL 4.9 oz
    SM4 Ultra 6.2 oz

    I would say that as the weight increases, the "core" becomes more dominant, meaning a darker more focussed sound. However, the lighter pieces have a more lively and responsive feel.

    Of course, I only have a sample of three. I do have a Wick 4AM, which I should weigh as a comparison to the 4AL.

    -Carroll

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