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Thread: Learning euphonium in treble vs. bass clef

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    *snip*

    While I was in the USCG Band we encountered music that was only BC, but it was a fairly rare experience.

    *snip*
    Over the years here in our community band we've had several; we've got one right now, as a matter of fact ("Scramble," don't remember composer's name). Normal practice is that I bring the BC part home and generate an identical TC part on Finale.

  2. #12
    Out of curiosity...
    - When was Scramble published?
    - And WAS it published, or was it a manuscript?

    I was really referring to published music when I gave that quote. When hand writing something, I'm sure not going to blame a composer for not writing the same part twice!
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
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  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by djwpe View Post
    It seems that I am in the minority in that I started on Euph as a bass clef only reader. I added tenor when playing Trombone in high school, but it would take a while to become fluent again.

    I regret not learning treble as a child. Does anyone have a recommendation of how to go about learning Bb treble?

    Don Winston
    I recommend getting a TC version of Arban's, or any other method book you regularly use, and just get to work. That's how I learned BC, 4 years ago. It was not too painful and I got my regular workout in at the same time.

    - Carroll

  4. Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    Out of curiosity...- When was Scramble published?- And WAS it published, or was it a manuscript?I was really referring to published music when I gave that quote. When hand writing something, I'm sure not going to blame a composer for not writing the same part twice!
    There are two wind band compositions currently in print: a concert overture by Nigel Hess, commissioned by the Royal Air Force, published in 1994 (Farber, Boosey & Hawkes Concert Band Series); and a new incidental piece by Todd Stalter, published earlier this year (Alfred, Alfred Concert Band Series: note that "world parts," including TC euph, Bb BC euph, and Bb TC Trombone, are available by download).
    Last edited by megan; 10-23-2012 at 07:51 PM.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    Out of curiosity...
    - When was Scramble published?
    - And WAS it published, or was it a manuscript?

    I was really referring to published music when I gave that quote. When hand writing something, I'm sure not going to blame a composer for not writing the same part twice!
    Published, Alfred Music, 2012.

  6. #16
    As a long-time TC player (transitioned to euphonium from trumpet), I can tell you that I've had a devilish time pounding BC into my calcified brain cells. Practice, practice, and more practice with a fingering chart at the ready is the only thing that's worked for me!

  7. #17
    I'd suggest to give your son some tuba duetts, which you can play together with Tuba and Euphonium - Christmas carrols or similiar. There is a lot of stuff also for 2 Cellos. After a short time he'll play from BC naturally. Let the Bandleader teach your son in TC, you play with him in BC. It’s like to have parents with different mother tongues – a child will learn to speak both as a native speaker.

    By the way, my daughter spent a week with a children choir as a musical tutor. She’s 18 and want to become music teacher. She play’s well Cello, Clarinet (also Bassclarinet) and Saxophon and enjoys also playing Euphonium at an beginner/intermediate level. She brought my british style baritone to play with the choir among some trumpets and an Euph. She told me – “Bass clef - no problem, TC in Bb (trumpet parts) – no problem, I’ve played from TC concert pitch – also possible as well as playing from Tenor voice parts (TC, Concert pitch – 8)”. She simply tried it and it worked. I’m sure – she can play tenor clef as well due to her Cello skills, where the Tenor clef is a natural clef.

  8. #18
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    I'm like many who started on trumpet or cornet and initially learned TC. As a senior in high school and getting ready to go to college and play in the bands I needed to learn BC. I did this by learning to transpose. My method was different than Dave's (basically up 3 steps and change the key) but after awhile it was second nature. The strange thing is for the last 17 years I've played in a brass band where all the parts are in TC so I have to think a bit when I first read a BC part.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    When/if a treble clef players wishes to start playing bass clef, there are two choices. One is just starting from scratch and learning to read in the new clef. The other is by transposing. In my case I learned to transpose at sight first, and that gradually became reading without transposing as I got used to it.

    Here is a blog article about learning bass clef by transposing:

    http://www.dwerden.com/forum/entry.p...Clef-Euphonium
    This is how I learned to play in BC when it is necessary to do so, but as discussed, it is considerably easier to read euph parts in TC. I should add that I started to learn the transposing way at age 66 years, and with regular daily practice I became quite good at it. Younger euph players who I play with and can only read in one clef think the old dude is pretty "cool".

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by euphomate View Post
    This is how I learned to play in BC when it is necessary to do so, but as discussed, it is considerably easier to read euph parts in TC. I should add that I started to learn the transposing way at age 66 years, and with regular daily practice I became quite good at it. Younger euph players who I play with and can only read in one clef think the old dude is pretty "cool".
    Hey, dude, we're the same age. Would you agree that old farts make the best euphists?

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