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Thread: Adams Endorsement

  1. #21

    Adams Endorsement

    I'm at Butler studying with Melissa Williams.

    Sean

  2. #22

    Adams Endorsement

    I'm working on getting a list of USA dealers anyway, because I'd like to know for my own reference. If I get that, I'll post it here.

    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Indianapolis area
    Posts
    908

    Adams Endorsement

    HEY!! ;-)

    Sorry to hijack the thread, but...

    Come to the Brass Choir concert tomorrow (Sunday) at 4pm...

    Christ United Methodist Church, Bob Grechesky conducting.

    8540 US 31 South--31 South & Stop 12 Road...Right across from Game Preserve and mattress store on 31

    You'll hear 9 million fast euphonium notes on the last piece. ;-0

    I'll even let you play my 5050!!

    OK...terug naar het onderwerp! (back to the topic)

    Jim
    Jim Williams N9EJR (love 10 meters)
    Yamaha 642-II Neo, Wedge 103E, SM3.5
    Yamaha 321, Yamaha 621 Baritone
    Conn 50H trombone
    Blue P-bone
    www.soundcloud.com/jweuph

  4. Adams Endorsement

    Hello, I was just wondering what thickness is your model? I recently purchased an Adams but I purchased the .80 model. I was also wondering how the thickness effects the sound?

    -Luis


  5. #25

    Adams Endorsement

    Luis,

    First, congratulations on your new horn!

    Because my current horn is a loaner, I don't really know the thickness. I'll see if I can find out. But I suspect the sterling silver bell is a large factor in the sound. Choosing red brass or yellow brass also makes a difference. Which did you choose for your horn?

    My previous horn, the Sterling, got damaged in flight to Tucson where I had to perform, so I borrowed another Sterling for that performance. My own had a red brass bell, but the one I borrowed had a yellow brass bell. The two horns sounded very different. Both had a nice tone, but the character was smoother with the yellow brass and more lively with the red brass (sometimes called "gold brass"). I'm planning to be at the factory in July to choose a permanent horn for myself, so I'll have a chance to test these variables. I'm sure I'll report back after that experience.

    A heavier gauge metal usually contributes to a somewhat "deeper" sound. And in general heavier metal allows the horn to handle higher dynamics more easily. But the heavier the metal, the less responsive the feel. As with any other factor, there are always tradeoffs. I'm a little worried about choosing my permanent horn. With so many choices, it's going to be a tough job to figure out the best all-around horn for me! What if I like the sound of "horn A" better, but find "horn B" much more responsive??? To some extent, I'm sure those are the kind of choices I'll be making. My hope is that one horn will just "speak" to me and say it is "my horn."

    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  6. #26

    Adams Endorsement

    Dave,

    Given the tradeoffs involved in these different metals, what do you think of the idea behind the Kanstul 976 removable bell option? If you could buy an Adams with multiple bells, would you imagine that helping with anything, or (since you can probably only play with one bell at a time!) merely making things even more complicated (and expensive!)?

    Frank
    Frank Manola

    Pan American Eb, Meinl Weston 20, Wessex "Solo" EEb, King 2341 tubas
    Besson New Standard, TE 1150 compensating euphs
    Park Street Brass
    Old South UMC Brass & Organ, Reading MA
    Wakefield Retired Men's Club Band
    Windjammers Unlimited

  7. #27

    Adams Endorsement

    fmanola,

    That's a great questions, to which I have no solid answer!

    First, the basics. If you take any horn and have a custom shop turn it into a screw-bell horn (or some other way of removing/reattaching the bell), the sound and response of the horn will change. It changes the nature of the attachment of the small end of the bell and also the solidity of the braces that touch the bell.

    On new horns, from an engineer's point of view, it also removes the option of using a soldered-on leadpipe.

    I for one would not be willing to have a second bell kicking around so I could swap it at will. Too much space, given the care you would have to take to not damage it when it's unattached. And how would I travel by air? It would require a separate case. So it's a practical matter, really.

    It would be great if someone on the forum has any knowledge of the experiences of horn and trombone players who have converted their horns, or who have compared similar horns with and without removable bells!

    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  8. Adams Endorsement

    a couple fridays ago (the tenth), I went to TMEA and got to try many euphoniums i've been so curious to try for so long. Thinking back on it, my favorites were the besson 967, miraphone 5050, sterling, and the adams custom. One I was dissapointed in was Meinl Weston (I don't feel the pheonix on display was well oiled up for the occassion).

    The adams valves were among the best I tried all day, even though you might not think so by looking at the valve caps. The top model has varnished wood with gold trim and it's a pretty thick cap, but it was just delightful to play on (and it looked classy). The sound was among my favorite, at the end of the day I found myself going back between their booth and the besson booth the most. Simply due to price, I lean towards the sovereign, but the adams handled amazingly. I get what Dave says about not getting to experience the full sound in the midst of it all, I wish I would've had more time on the horns to compare better. Adams seems to be innovating quite a bit, not only with the mpc reciever, but all of their horns had something to show for!


  9. Adams Endorsement

    Hey ya'll,

    Nice discussion going on re; Adams, materials, thickness, bells etc. Mine is a .50 and i didn't notice much difference between .50, .55 and .60, although the instruments i tried were different vintages and so could not easily be compared "apples to apples". However at NAMM I tried a .80 (sounds like some lucky person bought it!) and I really liked it. Thinking in fractions of millimetres, .50 to .55 is not much, but .50 to .80 you can feel a noticeable difference. The .80 had a soldered yellow brass bell. FOR ME I think ideally I would trend toward a thicker metal with a soldered yellow brass bell - the tone is a little bit more malleable in that I can stay dark when I want but brighten up if I need to. I like the sterling bell a lot on my horn, but I sense it resonates different overtones that a material like yellow brass, and tends to stay on the darker side regardless of dynamics (again, in my opinion, YMMV, etc.)And don't forget that the sterling bells (those I've seen) are not soldered, some of the yellow brass are and others aren't. Soldering the bell ring (or not) does make a noticeable difference too.

    I would love to have an option to try different bells although I appreciate the logistical issues Dave mentioned. And regarding air travel, one word of caution abuot the Bona case which I don't like especially much: it is just barely too big to fit inthe overhead of almost any domestic flight (md80, 737, etc) so you'll have to plan to check it unless you're flying on larger aircraft. i also find the straps cumbersome and way too close together (from stem to stern) to sit well on my back. Also unless you stand it on the bell, it tips rather easily. I know a lot of folks like the bona cases, but in my personal opinion the euph case is a good idea that just didn't turn out very well. If my Adams had a 4th valve lock I'd use a gig bag and a *real* hard case for air travel. I feel the Bona is OK to check, but makes me nervous.

    Matt


  10. #30

    Adams Endorsement

    Matt,

    RE: Bonna, I agree about the straps not being too comfortable, but I still like the fact that they are there. It would make it possible to backpack it when my hands are already busy pulling my suitcase and carrying my other stuff.

    I didn't even think about the overhead compartment issue. If I were going to do that, I would absolutely use a soft case because they are just lighter and more comfortable to backpack. But I always check my horn (I know, I know...), and the Bonna seems a good compromise for that use.

    According to Miel Adams, they travel to shows with the horns as checked luggage and have had no problem. (I wonder if they ever used Delta...)

    The only thing that makes me a little nervous is the clearance from the receiver to the edge of the case. It's pretty close. But I don't think it would be likely to get squeezed in that direction considering the way they strap the luggage in usually. The case is more likely to be squeezed along the sides (front/back), and it seems pretty strong that way.

    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

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