Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 25 of 25

Thread: H.N. White King Artist Model 1165?

  1. Conn Connstellation

    Speaking of Conn Connstellations.....My 1968 model (L-series serial number) now has both the bell front and the upright bell and cases for each. I was able to score a somewhat bent but serviceable upright bell off of eBay for my 24I along with a case to match. I just dropped off the horn with straight bell at Osmun Music to get the dents and creases in the bell straightened. So I guess now I can say that I have a 24I/25I convertible Connstellation. Also, last summer, I got the valves redone with teflon guides and synthetic felts. Valve action is now great!
    Sterling Virtuoso 1052HS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HS baritone & Conn 24I/25I euphonium
    New England Brass Band/New England Wind Symphony
    New England Tuba Quartet/Nashoba Valley Concert Band

  2. Hi all,

    New member who has been taking advantage of this site. It's been a big help and decided to take the plunge and buy a "American baritone". It's a King artist 1165 with the gold wash bell and silver satin finish, believe it is late 1920's vintage based on the serial number from the H white site Wow what a nice sound. The wife prefers this sound over the trumpet.

    Yes a 4 valve would be better but for my purposes, and the cost, it was a good fit. It plays great and good intonation from the E below the BC staff to the F above. Took me some time to get it on the mark with the help of a tuner app. Takes a few moments to lip it in and working on hitting it right the first time.

    When they were packaging up the horn the music lyre was thrown out because the spring was broken. It would have been nice to have it and could have gotten the local repair guy to replace the spring By chance does anyone have one they would like to sell?

  3. #23
    That should be a nice horn for you!

    Quote Originally Posted by Tomahawk View Post
    When they were packaging up the horn the music lyre was thrown out because the spring was broken. It would have been nice to have it and could have gotten the local repair guy to replace the spring By chance does anyone have one they would like to sell?
    Not to worry. You can buy this and bend it yourself, or have a repair person bend it, and at $6.75 it would be a lot easier than fitting a new spring:

    https://www.amazon.com/Ameriplate-50.../dp/B000EELATW
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  4. #24

    What about in silver or nickle?

    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    Not to worry. You can buy this and bend it yourself, or have a repair person bend it, and at $6.75 it would be a lot easier than fitting a new spring:

    https://www.amazon.com/Ameriplate-50.../dp/B000EELATW
    And where can you get a lyre like that finished to match a silver or nickel horn? Almost all the lyres, regardless of instrument, I have seen are lacquered brass.

    How much does it run to have the lyre fastener attached to a baritone if it did not come with one. I play mostly in a concert setting and so do not need it. But it would be nice to have if the opportunity for a parade ever comes around.
    Sara Hood

  5. Observations:
    1) Yes, it is a King artist. You can tell because of the direct in leadpipe instead of a loop lead pipe.
    2) The bore from the beginning is .562. This produces a "horny" quality: not as dark as a Besson with a .580 bore or larger, but not as bright as a trombone. It blends better in a standard concert band with both saxes (especially tenor sax, which doubles in a lot of concert band arrangements), and brass, lending depth to trombones and clarity to tubas, depending on the orchestration.
    3) Because it has a more conical profile, the American hybrid instrument is more properly called a "small bore euphonium." However, in American parlance, since the USA did not have brass band baritones generally, it has always been referred to as a "baritone horn."
    4) The nominal bore through the valve block is .562. Always has been, always will be.
    5) One reason the Besson euphs may have taken more air is that the throat on the M21 mouthpiece, as well as the popular 6 1/2 AL which is also a common mouthpiece for these instruments, is generally smaller than the throat on the mouthpieces supplied with the Besson euphs. Without getting into a long technical discussion as to the physics of flow dynamics compared to static dynamics, once the air transitions the throat into the backbore into the leadpipe, velocity essentially drops to zero, just like the delta at the mouth of a river. So the amount of air required has nothing to do with the bore of the instrument. So according to Bernoulli's principle, the pressure drops as the aperture, or throat diameter increases, requiring more volume of air to maintain the pressure, meaning the amount of air required to get the embouchure vibrating increases. This is compounded by the generally deeper cups of the Besson mouthpieces compared to the American mouthpieces, so that there is not as much "back pressure" to interact with the embouchure, which also translates to the requirement of more air.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •