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Thread: Really Cleaning Your Horn

  1. Really Cleaning Your Horn

    Originally posted by: RickF

    Don't know how many read Dave Werden's blog, but he recently reviewed a new product for cleaning out your horn. It's called the 'QHR' (Quick Horn Rinse with Sudser). It has a built-in dispenser where you can add detergent and and a valve to control how much detergent is added to the forced stream of water. I just ordered one today as this looks very useful. Thanks Dave for this review. AND... there was no shipping charge when I ordered mine (at least so far). Here's a link:

    QHR
    I ordered mine about 10 minutes after Dave posted his link and received mine last Thursday. Very quick shipment. It has been raining and I want to use this outside so I haven't had a chance yet, but the device seems well built. Can't wait to try since my Sterling really needs a cleaning!

    Doug

    Sterling Virtuoso 1065HGS & Adams E3 Prototype 0.70 Top Sprung valves
    Sterling Virtuoso 1050HGS baritone
    New England Brass Band
    Winchendon Winds/Townsend Military Band

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,574

    Really Cleaning Your Horn

    I got to try out my new QHR today. It worked pretty well and only took about 15 mins. With the added soap, a couple of slides blew out (1 & 2), but I kind of expected that. No big deal as I did this on my front lawn. The only regret is I couldn't use warm water since it was from a hose in the front yard. But, still seemed to do a pretty good job. (Maybe it rinsed out a bad note or two but not sure.)
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (recently sold)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    El Cumbanchero (Raphael Hernandez, arr. Naohiro Iwai)
    Greensleeves (arr. Alfred Reed)


  3. #43

    Really Cleaning Your Horn

    Originally posted by: RickF ...a couple of slides blew out (1 & 2), but I kind of expected that.
    I'm not sure how to handle the first valve slide issue, but there is an easy fix for the 2nd slide. Get an old-fashioned eraser (Pink Pearl type) and trim it a bit on the ends until it fits tightly between the inner tubes of the 1st and 3rd slide, fitted up against the bottom of the 2nd slide.

    And/or you could try a little more soak time and a little less water pressure!

    It hasn't been a problem on my Sterling. The 2nd valve has the Amado water key, so I'm not constantly pulling that slide. It tends to get a little stuck from lack of movement, and water pressure is not going to blow it out.

    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams Artist (Adams E3)
    Alliance Mouthpiece (DC4)
    YouTube: dwerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    Twitter: davewerden
    Instagram: davewerdeneuphonium

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,574

    Really Cleaning Your Horn

    Thanks Dave. I'll have to try that.

    Oh, the 1st slide that blew out was the comp slide - as I had the 4th valve locked down. I wasn't clear.

    BTW, I know this quick rinse is no substitute for an annual cleaning at my local tech shop
    .
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (recently sold)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    El Cumbanchero (Raphael Hernandez, arr. Naohiro Iwai)
    Greensleeves (arr. Alfred Reed)


  5. Really Cleaning Your Horn

    I received mine a few days ago and really like the design and manufacturing quality. I was expecting something a little less "nice" - fwiw...It will be a little while before I give it a try since I am entering my Band's summer concert schedule. I like to keep a clean horn and expect this will do the trick.
    Besson 767 New Standard, SM 4U
    Irondequoit Concert Band & Penfield Pops, Rochester NY area

    F-Alphorn, Hubert Hense maker, Alderwood
    Alphorn Society of Western NY

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,574

    Really Cleaning Your Horn

    Bill Ricker added a page to Facebook about his new QHR (with sudser). Here's a link:

    Quick Horn Rinse
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (recently sold)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    El Cumbanchero (Raphael Hernandez, arr. Naohiro Iwai)
    Greensleeves (arr. Alfred Reed)


  7. Really Cleaning Your Horn

    may I also suggest an air compressor to dry it out fully after that.

  8. #48

    Really Cleaning Your Horn

    Originally posted by: prototypedenNIS may I also suggest an air compressor to dry it out fully after that.


    I've often seen repairmen do this and I don't really understand it -- what's the point of totally drying out the inside of the instrument when I'm just going to start blowing into it and get it all wet again? It's especially odd to me when my repairman will take several minutes to dry the inside of my outer trombone slide with his compressed air and then I turn around and use my spray bottle to get it all wet again??

    --
    Barry

  9. Really Cleaning Your Horn

    stale water left in an instrument can start encouraging growth. If left inside a case for a length of time, you can get black mould.

    For a trombone slide, having the inners dry allows a fuil visual inspection of the cleanliness of the tubes (similar to the James Bond gun barrel shot). Outers being dry (with dry inners) also allows for a better inspection of slide wear and action. The slide mandrels are steel and should not be wet when working. The felts in the cork barrels also should be dry or they will become spongy and store gunk in them.

    We store our trombones dry. Greased tuning slides, oiled valves. The only moisture inside the instrument when it's done is he condensation from the playtest on the way out.

    Brass instruments are meant to be dry. You empty your spit before you put your horn away, we dry it after it's been cleaned or frankly, we're being counter-productive to cleaning it at all.

  10. #50

    Really Cleaning Your Horn

    Originally posted by: prototypedenNIS stale water left in an instrument can start encouraging growth. If left inside a case for a length of time, you can get black mould.
    Don't disagree.

    For a trombone slide, having the inners dry allows a fuil visual inspection of the cleanliness of the tubes
    OK

    Brass instruments are meant to be dry. You empty your spit before you put your horn away, we dry it after it's been cleaned or frankly, we're being counter-productive to cleaning it at all.
    Disagree there. If I were cleaning my instrument at home with a bath and intending to put it away for a week or more after the cleaning, then I can see the logic in drying it carefully with compressed air etc.. And in your professional capacity, I understand you doing it too. But if I'm giving my instrument a bath or whatever at home and intending to play it immediately, I don't see that spending the time to dry it all that carefully makes any difference, because as I'm playing it every surface of the inside of the instrument gets wet anyways by condensation from my breath -- try playing one of those clear plastic recorders for children to see what I mean. I think it's probably even more dry just naturally after a bath than it would be after playing, because the water would tend to "sheet" off the insides of the tubes if I'm emptying a lot of water from a rinse out -- but if I'm playing it, it tends to just sort of cling to the insides, other than where it builds up enough to drip down to where I'm emptying it via slides and water keys. If I'm not going to get out the air compressor EVERY SINGLE TIME I PLAY, I don't see any reason to do it right after I give the instrument a cleaning in the tub.

    --
    Barry

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