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Thread: Breaking in a new euph: best practices

  1. #21

    Breaking in a new euph: best practices

    As one experiments, it's probably a good idea to keep an eye on what articles might leave bits and pieces behind.

    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  2. Breaking in a new euph: best practices

    In reading your post I have a question. What is the concern with scraches on the inside of the horn? The only place I can think of where you don't want scraches is in the casings. Just wondering, don't want miss something.

    Jerry Olson

    Mineeapolis MN


  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,154

    Breaking in a new euph: best practices

    Hi Jerry,

    With brass being pretty soft, it can be scratched fairly easily. Any scratches could provide a place for dirt to adhere to and grow that ugly green stuff. Just to be clear, I'm not worried about the bristles of a brush scratching - but the metal snake itself maybe scratching the inside of the lead pipe.

    Thanks.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    El Cumbanchero (excerpts)
    ; Raphael Hernandez, arr. Iwai from our Swing/Salsa concert 2018
    Video of above: El Cumbanchero:

  4. Breaking in a new euph: best practices

    Hi Rick, I woulds say that the scraches a snake would cause would make little difference in the rate of crud growth. It seem that most of the player on this forum keep there horns quite clean. I only wish my customers would do the same.

    Jerry Olson

    Minneapolis, MN


  5. #25

    Breaking in a new euph: best practices

    I would be more concerned that scratches on the inside of the leadpipe would disturb the airflow, and therefore negatively affect the sound and the blow of the horn.*While the impact of any single scratch may not be significant, over time the cumulative effect of multiple scratches - particularly scratches grouped around a particular location, such as at the outside radius of a bend in the leadpipe - very well could be.
    I would also be concerned that, over time, a casing of a coiled wire snake would file away metal at the points where it contacts the leadpipe. Again, any single pass is not likely to do much damage, but the cumulative damage over 5-10 years of weekly cleaning ....
    *

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,154

    Breaking in a new euph: best practices

    Originally posted by: fsung

    I would be more concerned that scratches on the inside of the leadpipe would disturb the airflow, and therefore negatively affect the sound and the blow of the horn.*While the impact of any single scratch may not be significant, over time the cumulative effect of multiple scratches - particularly scratches grouped around a particular location, such as at the outside radius of a bend in the leadpipe - very well could be.

    I would also be concerned that, over time, a casing of a coiled wire snake would file away metal at the points where it contacts the leadpipe. Again, any single pass is not likely to do much damage, but the cumulative damage over 5-10 years of weekly cleaning ....

    *
    Good concerns - I agree. Although any scratches would seem small, over time with continued use, they could get deeper and more numerous.

    When my son was in HS and playing trombone, (about 18 yrs. ago) he took lessons with a great teacher... Art Sares. Mr. Sares was first call trombonist in Chicago for many years and inherited Tommy Dorsey's gold plated King 2B. At every lesson, Mr. Sares would inspect my son's mpc to be sure it was clean and sparkling. He said, "any rough spots or build up would affect his sound negatively". As I recall, I think he suggested 'Twinkle' to clean and polish his mouthpiece. The shaft of a mpc is only about 2" long. The leadpipe on a euph is many times longer - so any scratches there could really hurt one's sound.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    El Cumbanchero (excerpts)
    ; Raphael Hernandez, arr. Iwai from our Swing/Salsa concert 2018
    Video of above: El Cumbanchero:

  7. Breaking in a new euph: best practices

    I'm wondering if anyone has looked at the inside of the tubing with a bore scope or a fiberoptic inspection tool. We have one in the shop here and you would be suprised how rough the inside the tuibing really is.


  8. #28

    Breaking in a new euph: best practices

    I had the opportunity to view the inside of the leadpipe on my Virtuoso with a borescope shortly after buying it, courtesy of a client who is a gunsmith.

    It was significantly smoother than the inside of the shank on my Schilke and Wick mouthpieces, and I intend to do everything I can to keep it that way.

  9. #29

    Breaking in a new euph: best practices

    Originally posted by: fsung I had the opportunity to view the inside of the leadpipe on my Virtuoso with a borescope shortly after buying it, courtesy of a client who is a gunsmith.



    It was significantly smoother than the inside of the shank on my Schilke and Wick mouthpieces, and I intend to do everything I can to keep it that way.
    Hey, as long as you don't see anything actually moving inside your shank or leadpipe I figure you're in good shape

    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  10. Last Friday, I went to Ferrysburg, MI, test played a Wessex Dolce, and put a deposit on one of the new horns arriving mid-December. I haven't had to break-in a new horn since I got my 321S back in 1983 and, after reading the forum, have a couple of questions:

    1. When you take the valves out for wipe down/re-oiling, do you also run the cloth through the valve casings?
    2. When I spoke with Andy at Wessex and mentioned I was using blue juice in my Yamaha, he was pretty adamant that I should not use it in my Wessex. He recommended using Yamaha Light Synthetic. However, I read in one of the forum links that using Synthetic was not recommended when breaking in a horn. Thoughts?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by IaMichael; 11-07-2017 at 11:54 AM.

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