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Thread: More E Flat Tuba Questions

  1. More E Flat Tuba Questions

    I think I am slightly confused now.
    Please forgive my ignorance, I enjoy learning and the only way I will know what in the world I am doing is to ask.
    First off, The E-Flat Tuba I received actually has a Bass Trombone Mouthpiece, should I use it or my BBb mouthpiece?
    After I get the mouthpiece dilema figured out, I am really going to get basic here.
    Please ask for clarity if my question doesn't make sense.
    If I have a BBb tuba part (normal Tuba part) in front of me and I have the E-flat in my lap. I see a C below the staff...1&3 on BBb, I would play 1&2 on the E-Flat? Same note or would I need to transpose? Can I even play normal bass clef Tuba parts with the E-Flat? Or would I need to transpose all the Tuba parts?
    Sorry for all the questions, this is what happens when someone tries to teach themselves a new instrument. Thank You for all your help and this wonderful site.
    Darren

  2. #2
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    More E Flat Tuba Questions

    Hi Darren,

    The tuba when reading "bass clef" music is a non-transposing instrument. Since the BBb music you've been reading is already written in concert pitch, you'll just have to learn the new fingurings to play the same pitch on Eb tuba (easy for me to say, LOL).

    But in the British Style Brass Bands where almost everyone reads treble cleff (except the bass bone), the music written for Eb tuba in treble clef is transposed for the musician.

    That's my understanding anyway. I'm sure someone will chime in if I'm mistaken on this.

    Hope that helps.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    When the Saints Go Marching In (arr. Mashima) at ACB Conference Ft. Lauderdale
    Cell phone video of : El Cumbanchero:

  3. More E Flat Tuba Questions

    Thanks Again Rick! I guess I am just going to play around with it at rehearsal Monday.
    I guess it would actually be better to use the Tuba mouthpiece?
    I know the E-flat is better for upper register, would this actually be more of a preference?
    Darren

  4. #4

    More E Flat Tuba Questions

    As a euphonium player who picked up tuba later in life, I would suggest using a tuba mouthpiece for the tuba. You will get a much better sound, and it probably won't take you too long to gt used to it.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  5. More E Flat Tuba Questions

    Great, thanks Dave!
    I had thought about using my Bass Bone mouthpiece, being I switch back and forth between the two horns during any given rehearsal or gig. I enjoy playing both, but I end up going back to my old T-bone for the higher, faster parts.
    Just as a side note, I may of missed it somewhere, What rank did you retire as? I am ex-active duty Marine Bandsman, 4 years, got out as an E-3.
    Darren

  6. #6

    More E Flat Tuba Questions

    I was an E-8 when I retired, which was the highest enlisted rank we had at the time. The Band was able to acquire an E-9 a couple years later, so now they have a complete spectrum. It has also increased in size from about 45 to about 60 musicians since I left, which was their first increase in over 40 years.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  7. #7

    More E Flat Tuba Questions

    Originally posted by: RickF
    you'll just have to learn the new fingurings to play the same pitch on Eb tuba (easy for me to say, LOL).
    (Hi everyone.)

    I think this is exactly the situation I'm in. I've just started tuba (that's what the band needed, and I love it). I've been handed the E flat from storage. The other tuba player has a B flat, and hasn't been able to help me work out the whole transposition guff. (I've only had it for four days and one band session!)

    I'm thinking of just writing out a fingering chart for what I'm reading from the concert tuba part. Can anybody help me with this-- maybe give a quick explanation of what I'm reading vs. what he's playing vs. what I should play? Maybe you can point me at an appropriate chart?

    I've come from flute and bari sax, but it's been ten years since I was in a band and having to do transposition.

    Any help is much appreciated

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    More E Flat Tuba Questions

    Hi Jexia,

    Welcome to the forum.

    From what you say... "I'm reading from the concert tuba part", that tells me you're reading bass clef music -- which is concert pitch. Here's a finger chart for Eb horn reading bass clef.

    Eb tuba fingerings

    If you're playing in a brass band from treble clef music, it's a transposed part and the fingerings would be the same for any brass instrument because the part is transposed for that instrument. As far as how you should sound compared to the Bb player, that depends. The Eb and Bb tuba parts are probably different -- in harmony or possibly octave apart. But if you play from the same part (bass clef) as the Bb tuba player, you should sound the same note as the Bb player. In other words, you'll have to use different fingerings on that Eb horn to sound the pitch.

    Hope this helps.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    When the Saints Go Marching In (arr. Mashima) at ACB Conference Ft. Lauderdale
    Cell phone video of : El Cumbanchero:

  9. #9

    More E Flat Tuba Questions

    Originally posted by: RickF

    But if you play from the same part (bass clef) as the Bb tuba player, you should sound the same note as the Bb player. In other words, you'll have to use different fingerings on that Eb horn to sound the pitch.

    Nod nod. So say, we're in the bass clef. The note is in the second gap from the top (an E). He's playing an E, and I'd be playing my A, right?

    Basically I'd take that fingering chart and adjust it all down a fifth?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,187

    More E Flat Tuba Questions

    Originally posted by: Jexia

    Originally posted by: RickF

    But if you play from the same part (bass clef) as the Bb tuba player, you should sound the same note as the Bb player. In other words, you'll have to use different fingerings on that Eb horn to sound the pitch.
    Nod nod. So say, we're in the bass clef. The note is in the second gap from the top (an E). He's playing an E, and I'd be playing my A, right?

    Basically I'd take that fingering chart and adjust it all down a fifth?
    You would both be playing 'E' -- or sounding the same note. The fingering is different for you, but it sounds the same note. You would be using the '12' fingering and the Bb player would be using '2' fingering. The notes on the staff are all the same for both players. You just have to use a different fingering to play that same note.

    Not sure what you mean by taking it down 'a fifth'. The fingering chart is for Eb reading bass clef (concert pitch) music.

    Hope this helps.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    When the Saints Go Marching In (arr. Mashima) at ACB Conference Ft. Lauderdale
    Cell phone video of : El Cumbanchero:

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