Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: the German style march

  1. the German style march

    Teike's Old Comrades is #1 on my list but in my favorites are :

    Hermann Blankenburg's True Comrades in Arms & Ernst August...

    Franz von Blon's Under the Flag of Victory & Sounds of Peace...

    Nowowieski's Under Freedom's Flag


    Just a few, all have soaring and prominent euphonium lines. There are so many good marches out there with nice euphonium parts. Colonel Bogey (particularly if the saxes don't play!!), Alford's The Standard of St. George, Fucik's Children of the Regiment & The Florentiner so forth and so on.

    As for Sousa, well he didn't write very many nice marches with the euphonium in mind, did he? Nice Marches, but not as much fun to play as those of the German style.

    Give me any march with a soaring euphonium line that stands out above the band.

  2. #2

    the German style march

    The Florentiner March is one of my favourites for counter melodies. If you want to do something different, you should grab the bassoon part sometime. I had to play the bassoon part the one time, neat part. It combines the tuba and horn part, has a little a neat little 16th note trumpet entrence at one sport, has the counter melody with the euphs at the trio, neat part at the end though it just combines the tuba / horn part. I don't think many people know what the bassoon does 3/4 of time in marches.

    As for Sousa, a few of his marches are alright, King Cotton, Bullets and Bayonetts are always fun for me to play. I've done few Sousa Concerts on euph. and trombone with Minot City Band. When playing the trombone parts on trombone, you appreciate the euphonium parts a lot more. My only grr. at a Minot City Band Sousa concert was spacing out on the trombone part on the last strain of Stars and Stripes. The whole back row had to stand up and go in front of the band for the final strain. I got lost at a couple of spots so I played the euph. part. A friend of mine in the audience noticed. My excuses were that I only had one rehersal to learn the part and its been a good 4 years since I played trombone for anything.

    I wonder if Sousa would of written the euph. and trumpet parts differently with the larger bore euphs we have now days. I find Sousa concerts a bit taxing on my euph. chops esp. when you have trumpet sections that like blowing 20 cents sharp.

  3. the German style march

    I find that Sousa liked to use the Euph to play the melody down an octave from the clarinet or cornet. If an ensemble balances itself to the melody in the Euph they come closer to the "Sousa" sound than by any other means. So, what may be lacking in great countermelodies in Sousa is made up for by using the Euph as a meldoy isntrument.

  4. #4

    the German style march

    Give me any march with a soaring euphonium line that stands out above the band.

    Hear, Hear!!

    Smitty

  5. the German style march

    I love the march now that I've gotten to run through it. I found a good recording and the Euphs sore over. My now favorite march.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,156

    the German style march

    Originally posted by: whall1946

    I find that Sousa liked to use the Euph to play the melody down an octave from the clarinet or cornet. If an ensemble balances itself to the melody in the Euph they come closer to the "Sousa" sound than by any other means. So, what may be lacking in great countermelodies in Sousa is made up for by using the Euph as a meldoy isntrument.
    I heard Loras Schissell say almost the exact same thing when he was down here in S. Florida as our guest conductor. Maestro Schissell is a Sousa expert and works in the Library of Congress. Also is the director of the Virginia Grand Military Band. Excellent director - we always enjoy and learn something new when he's our guest conductor.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    When the Saints Go Marching In (arr. Mashima) at ACB Conference Ft. Lauderdale
    Cell phone video of : El Cumbanchero:


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •