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Thread: Recorders and Microphones

  1. #21
    Rick,

    I'd suggest:

    1. Use an external mic. I use an Audio-Technica stereo mic and it gives me great results, with plenty of low range. Listen to some of the videos I recently posted, made with that mic. The low end of the piano really comes through well, I think. The model I use is discontinued, but here is a similar mic: Audio-Technica Stereo Mic
      I've also heard very good things about a Rode stereo mic.
    2. Move the mic back more. I think you may have a proximity problem. The ratio of the distance from the mic to the high ww's is large compared to that between the mic and low brass. That requires either a good X/Y pattern or cardioid mics probably. Omni-directional will sound too echo-laden from the longer distance.
    3. If you can't move it back, and maybe even if you can, try to elevate it more. That will help a little with the distance-ratio-thing mentioned above. Also consider the line of sight. The lower the mic the more the bodies of the front rows are blocking the direct sound of the back rows.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,189
    Thanks Dave,

    All of your suggestions make a lot of sense. The mics cost more than the recorder itself.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    When the Saints Go Marching In (arr. Mashima) at ACB Conference Ft. Lauderdale
    Cell phone video of : El Cumbanchero:

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by RickF View Post
    The mics cost more than the recorder itself.
    Yep! The recorder has an easy job. It's mostly run by chips that are easily mass-produced and whose price gets lower with time. A mic still involves precision assembly and moving parts.

    Envision the principle it by reversing the sound stream. If you have a so-so amplifier/receiver in your stereo system and so-so speakers, you can make a huge improvement by upgrading to really good speakers. But with the old speakers in place, adding a new amp won't be as much of an apparent improvement.
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,189
    I remember the early days of stereo (vacuum tube era). The real audiophile would have separate components... pre-amp, power amp, good turntable with low 'wow and flutter'. They'd spend lots of money just on a cartridge for their turntable. Then some great speakers - some had a sand-filled cabinet. The old saying of "it's only as strong as its weakest link" still applies.

    Thanks again.
    Rick Floyd
    Miraphone 5050 - Warburton Brandon Jones sig mpc
    YEP-641S (on long-term loan to grandson)
    Doug Elliott - 102 rim; I-cup; I-9 shank


    "Always play with a good tone, never louder than lovely, never softer than supported." - author unknown.
    Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches
    When the Saints Go Marching In (arr. Mashima) at ACB Conference Ft. Lauderdale
    Cell phone video of : El Cumbanchero:

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Leadwood, MO
    Posts
    540
    Ok. So its 2018. Are there new mics or recorders that would be better suited for low brass recording or are the things mentioned previously still the best available? I have zero experience in recording but am interested in putting some recordings together.
    John 3:16

    Yamaha YSL-630 Trombone
    Conn 15I Euphonium
    Mack Brass Euphonium
    Conn Victor 5H Trombone
    Yamaha 354 Trombone
    Mack Brass 200S BBb Tuba

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Davidus1 View Post
    Ok. So its 2018. Are there new mics or recorders that would be better suited for low brass recording or are the things mentioned previously still the best available? I have zero experience in recording but am interested in putting some recordings together.
    Sort of. But mic and recorder technology has not changed much for sound quality. Changes to electronics have added new features, though.

    Here is my latest thought on the subject:

    http://www.dwerden.com/forum/entry.p...r-Good-Quality
    Dave Werden (ASCAP)
    Euphonium Soloist, U.S. Coast Guard Band, retired
    Adams E3, Denis Wick 4AL (classic)
    Instructor of Euphonium and Tuba
    Twitter: davewerden
    Facebook: davewerden
    YouTube: dwerden
    Owner of TubaEuph.com, DWerden.com

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Leadwood, MO
    Posts
    540
    Quote Originally Posted by davewerden View Post
    Sort of. But mic and recorder technology has not changed much for sound quality. Changes to electronics have added new features, though.

    Here is my latest thought on the subject:

    http://www.dwerden.com/forum/entry.p...r-Good-Quality
    Thanks Dave! I'll check that out as I'm interested in doing some recording of duets and things.
    John 3:16

    Yamaha YSL-630 Trombone
    Conn 15I Euphonium
    Mack Brass Euphonium
    Conn Victor 5H Trombone
    Yamaha 354 Trombone
    Mack Brass 200S BBb Tuba

  8. What are the best options for recording yourself in a small sized room to critique your own playing?

    I'm currently using a Blue Snowball on a boom arm placed about a foot from my bell on the -10dB cardioid setting. I can't get far enough away from the mic to avoid clipping while using the omnidirectional setting.
    Yamaha Neo 642TSII
    King 2280 (For Sale $1200)

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