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  1. QHR Euphonium Hand Strap - Review

    Bill Ricker is a doer. He sees a need in the realm of brass instruments and his mind starts working on solutions. He is the inventor of the very useful Quick Horn Rinse (QHR) for encouraging us to keep our horns clean by making it more painless. Now he has come up with a solution for those who struggle holding the horn securely without straining their left wrist over the long term.

    I have in the past used a "Duck Foot" that was custom made for Glenn Call. It was a curved metal brace ...
  2. Memorizing and Sight Reading

    I would like to memorize more often than I do. Playing without music, once you get to the point where you really have it memorized, frees you in several ways. But it takes time to get to that "safe" point.

    When you are looking at the music stand you are somewhat "locked" in position. That could actually be an advantage in a recording session if there is a mic on your bell, but for a live audience it limits your freedom to move along with your musical expression. You may also find that
    ...
  3. On Wings of Song - Euphonium Video

    This is my newest video: On Wings of Song ("Auf Flugeln des Gesanges") by Felix Mendelssohn, arranged by me. I did the arrangement years ago but I never got around to programming it anywhere that was recording the event... until now.

    It's a great song that I have always liked in its original form, and it seems like a natural for euphonium. It's fun to play and does not require any advanced technique. Thus it is a great learning tool for musical interpretation. You can easily find recordings ...
  4. One Way to Solve Valve-Combination Intonation Problems

    Whether or not you read my article on the Euphonium Compensating System, you probably know that each valve on a euphonium can be made in tune, but when they are used in combinations they create problems. The inventor of the modern low-brass family, Adolphe Sax, made the instrument below to deal with this problem. Each of the six valves directs air to a different bell. It's like the double-bell euphonium's last valve in that regard. The valve set is broken up, with three in one location for the right ...
  5. Video: Bless This House - Euphonium Duet

    Here is my newest video. Tim Morris and I are playing a duet, my arrangement of "Bless This House." This is from a rehearsal for a church service where the piece became the offertory. Tim is playing the first part, although I wrote the duet so both players have a chance for some of the melody. The recording is a little hampered by the bell angles; Tim is pointing much more toward the mic and I am pointing about 90 degrees from the mic, but the effect is still mostly there. See what you think! ...
  6. Video: Holy Holy Holy, arr. by Philip Sparke - Dave Werden, Euphonium

    Here is a video of a special arrangement of John Dykes' famous hymn "Holy Holy Holy" that we did for church on Sept. 14. This is from Philip Sparke's wonderful book of hymns set in special arrangements. This one is at the end of the book and is the hardest, but it is still not beyond most decent players. Range only goes up to a concert G and no multiple tonguing is required (although it can be used to "spark" thinks up a bit). There are two publications:

    Solo part and accompaniment ...
  7. Pearl Fishers Duet - Dave Werden and Tim Morris, Euphoniums

    Dave Werden and Tim Morris, euphoniums, and Sara Brunk, piano, performing Bizet's lovely "Pearl Fishers" duet ("Deep Inside the Sacred Temple"), arranged by Brian Gallion. The arrangement is available here:
    http://www.cimarronmusic.com/search.c...

    Tim and I are both playing Adams Custom euphonium, each one made of yellow and gold brass, with a sterling silver bell. The instruments are hand-made in Holland. Learn more here:
    http://www.dwerden.com/forum/showthre...
    ...
  8. Taking Music Seriously - Or NOT

    In 1981 the great British euphoniumist Barrie Perrins sent me a letter with some interesting enclosures. One had to do with jokes. It was an article he wrote for the magazine The Musician and was titled "It's a Funny World."

    The last part of the article dealt with musical jokes, and it told one of my favorite stories. It's a favorite partly because it points out the ease with which some reviewers (and "regular" people) assume something is good just because it's new. Here is the section: ...
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