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General Tuba-Euphonium Blog

  1. My New 2015 Adams Euphonium

    As discussed in the forum, I recently traded in my 2012 Adams for a 2015 model. The specs are the same:
    • .60" metal
    • Sterling silver bell
    • Brushed finish.
    • E1
    • I asked them to copy the vertical angle of my original leadpipe. This helps me play with a more normal head position (I have an upstream embouchure).


    One incentive to trade was that Adams has made some incremental improvements in performance along the way. The new horn plays even more easily and smoother than my already-impressive ...

    Updated 07-31-2015 at 09:22 PM by davewerden

    Categories
    Euphonium-Tuba Blog , General Tuba-Euphonium Blog
  2. Video: Exploring Double-Bell Techniques, Part 2 - the Yodel

    As I mentioned in my previous post, it is sometimes hard to imagine what the double-bell euphonium might be used for today if it had remained more popular throughout the the 20th Century. Here is my next experiment, getting a yodel effect. For this, I chose a fairly simple song from The Sound of Music, "The Lonely Goatherd." This also scratches another itch - to do more with Broadway and movie music.

    I have my eyes on another more complex example, but it will be while before I get to ...
  3. Video: Exploring Double-Bell Techniques with Gershwin's It Ain't Necessarily So

    I often wonder what the original double-bell euphonium artists did in the early 1900's. I read that they used the little bell for echo effects, and one would assume they would alternate between the bells per phrase or even per note. But I think if the instrument had gained mainstream popularity and kept it through the 20th century, new techniques would have evolved.

    I'm going to offer a couple different double-bell techniques in this video, plus two rarely-used conventional techniques. ...
  4. Listening to Recordings of Your Own Playing

    Have you ever met musicians who refuse to listen to their own recordings? I have... many times. They literally don't know what they are missing. On the other hand I have met players who are a little too enthralled with their own recordings. They also don't know what they are missing! Do you fit in either of those camps? Either one is actually understandable, but there are more useful ways to listen to your own recordings.

    Let me set some conditions before discussing this further. First, ...
  5. Morning Song by Roger Kellaway - New Video

    This is from my recital in March, 2015, at the University of Iowa. Morning Song was written for tuba virtuoso Roger Bobo and recorded by him a few decades ago. (The original LP has been remade into a CD, so you can hear Bobo play it here: Roger Bobo, tuba, playing Morning Song)

    I fell in love with the piece when I first heard it. Later, when I saw the sheet music, I saw that is was right in the prime euphonium range and set very high for the average tubist (it goes a step higher than ...
  6. Bydlo from Pictures at an Exhibition - Video and Sheet Music

    On a recent recital at the University of Iowa I performed Bydlo, from Pictures at an Exhibition. In the orchestral version (orchestrated by Ravel) this solo part is played on either tuba or euphonium. It was probably first played on a high-C French tuba (a step above the Bb euphonium), so among common instruments today the euphonium is a very logical choice to play it.

    Much as I did with my arrangement of the March from Holst's Second Suite, I have arranged Bydlo for euphonium and piano ...
  7. Developing Effective Vibrato

    Vibrato is a part of virtually every advanced euphonium performance. Among other instruments, it is used for most of the playing on strings, and much of the playing on cornet, trumpet, trombone, and tuba in the brasses, and flute, oboe, and saxophone in the woodwinds. French horn players don't use it as much in the USA, although Europeans use it more. The same is true for clarinet. Vocalists use vibrato most of the time. Clearly, any player beyond beginner level will need to learn how to produce ...
  8. Review: Euphonium Lap Pad from Quick Horn Rinse

    Our friends at Quick Horn Rinse have come up with another great solution to problems that many euphonium players face. The design and dimensions of modern euphoniums can make it tiring to hold them in the optimal playing position during concerts, rehearsals, and practice. Our tendency is to rest the bottom of the horn on the left leg. That relieves stress on the arms, but it usually places the mouthpiece too low, which results in players slouching to meet the mouthpiece.

    So euphoniumists ...
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