Blog Comments

  1. hyperbolica's Avatar
    I've had an Altieri bag for about 6 years, and a leather Reunion Blues for 37. The RB zipper has been replaced once, and some of the leather piping has worn through, but the horn was never damaged. The Altieri nylon materials are thin, and I've put a big crease in my bell. The Altieri was probably half the price of the leather bag, but it had nowhere near the protection. Leather is a premium material and I tend to be careful with it, while the nylon of the Altieri is thin, cheap, but I was still careful with it so I didn't damage my horn, but it still got damaged. There are other bags out there I prefer, like Protec and Soundware.
  2. tonewheeler's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by danielrehberg
    I have an Adams E2 and I was wondering how the fourth valve is protected in any case that isn't the Bonna that comes with the horn. Since there is nothing keeping the fourth valve down on the horn how can you put it in a gig bag without the valve getting damaged?
    Interesting point, I recently noticed a very slight bend in the valve stem of my 4th valve on my 5050. It did not effect playability at all. I had my repair tech fix the problem with no other issues. I suspect it was caused by the latch releasing inside the Cronkite bag on a couple of occasions. Most likely from it catching on material while removing in or out of the bag itself. So, yes, not having a valve latch could be an issue with any gig bag. I just make sure the latch has proper tension on the screw.
  3. davewerden's Avatar
    I've used mostly just a gig bag with my Adams horns since I got my first E1 in 2011. Until I bought the bag reviewed here I was using an Altieri, with has less padding. Never had a problem with the 4th valve, and Adams reports that there have been very few problems in general with the 4th valve (which is why they think it's OK to not have the lock on it). The Cronkhite bag has more padding.
    The only provision I make is to keep a cloth in the bottom of the bag, placed so the 4th valve rests on it. This is mostly to absorb any moisture that might leak from there or other places. However, I learned with my Sterling, which had a conventional 4th-valve flap/lock, that such a mechanism causes abrasion on the bag and gradually reduces the padding's cushion. The unlocked 4th valve actually does less abrading, oddly enough, probably because the edges are smoother than the flap's edges would be.
  4. danielrehberg's Avatar
    I have an Adams E2 and I was wondering how the fourth valve is protected in any case that isn't the Bonna that comes with the horn. Since there is nothing keeping the fourth valve down on the horn how can you put it in a gig bag without the valve getting damaged?
  5. foxavac64's Avatar
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  6. kbro's Avatar
    I grew up with a Classic 4AL on an Imperial euphonium in the 70s and early 80, so it made sense to get one to go with the Sovereign I acquired when I returned to playing after 25 years of “parental leave”, but I was never truly happy with it and, after a lot of experimentation (thank the Lord for eBay!) I settled on the Heritage 4ABL - the almost sharp rim suits me much better than the heavier more rounded opening on the Classic.

    I inevitably got a Heritage 6BS for my baritone, which has evolved from an ancient Imperial through a JP Sterling 373 to my current Sovereign, but I find it quite tiring to play. I experimented with the Steven Mead Classic and Ultra without success, then discovered the Wick Classic 6BY, which is really intended for small shank euphoniums. Now I’m finding the rounded rim more comfortable, which is making me thing I should give the old 4AL another go on my euphonium.

    It’s a good job my mouthpiece cases each have 2 slots :-)
  7. kbro's Avatar
    I grew up with a Classic 4AL on an Imperial euphonium in the 70s and early 80, so it made sense to get one to go with the Sovereign I acquired when I returned to playing after 25 years of parental leave, but I was never truly happy with it and, after a lot of experimentation (thank the Lord for eBay!) I settled on the Heritage 4ABL - the almost sharp rim suits me much better than the heavier more rounded opening on the Classic.

    I inevitably got a Heritage 6BS for my baritone, which has evolved from an ancient Imperial through a JP Sterling 373 to my current Sovereign, but I find it quite tiring to play. I experimented with the Steven Mead Classic and Ultra without success, then discovered the Wick Classic 6BY, which is really intended for small shank euphoniums. Now Im finding the rounded rim more comfortable, which is making me thing I should give the old 4AL another go on my euphonium.

    Its a good job my mouthpiece cases each have 2 slots :-)
  8. kbro's Avatar
    I grew up with a Classic 4AL on an Imperial euphonium in the 70s and early 80, so it made sense to get one to go with the Sovereign I acquired when I returned to playing after 25 years of “parental leave”, but I was never truly happy with it and, after a lot of experimentation (thank the Lord for eBay!) I settled on the Heritage 4ABL - the almost sharp rim suits me much better than the heavier more rounded opening on the Classic.

    I inevitably got a Heritage 6BS for my baritone, which has evolved from an ancient Imperial through a JP Sterling 373 to my current Sovereign, but I find it quite tiring to play. I experimented with the Steven Mead Classic and Ultra without success, then discovered the Wick Classic 6BY, which is really intended for small shank euphoniums. Now I’m finding the rounded rim more comfortable, which is making me thing I should give the old 4AL another go on my euphonium.

    It’s a good job my mouthpiece cases each have 2 slots :-)
  9. Jonathantuba's Avatar
    Dave, Thank you for your positive review and your comments on the Sinfonico.

    We will certainly take your advise on the 4th valve slide being slightly shorter. We try to make Wessex instruments suit as many players as possible, so it is always better to make slides slightly shorter, if some people have problems with flat notes, as others can always pull out if they find otherwise.
  10. davewerden's Avatar
    hyperbolica: very good points! I made a decision to not talk about the used market because that is such a huge variable. And some folks want to buy a new horn, or have no safe way to buy a used horn, etc. In my situation I would certainly consider either something like a Wessex or a good used horn for a secondary instrument. (Sidebar: I own 3 slide trombones; two are newer Yamaha models and the 3rd is an old King Liberty. In some ways that old Liberty is the sweetest one to play!)
  11. hyperbolica's Avatar
    Yeah, these are some really good points. Also you might consider that some pros or semi-pros buy secondary instruments, that you might use for learning slide or valve techniques, or for additional gig opportunities, or just for the stimulation of learning something new. My trombones are pro-level, but I don't need pro-level valve instruments, so I turn to the Chinese market you reference, but also the used pro market. You can find the level of quality that you need at various price points, with the appearance or maybe condition being the variable for older used pro equipment and reputation and durability being the variable for the lower priced Chinese horns. It's totally realistic to find an 80 year old trombone that you can use professionally, as long as its in good condition, and in some cases (where performance and collecting interests intersect) sometimes the older instruments can be as expensive as new ones. Just a reminder that the used market is a valid place to find good quality stuff too, and is often a better choice than the low priced new options.
  12. Rodgeman's Avatar
    Looks like he got it modified into a two piece bell.

    Still wonder why it has not been done on a euphonium bell. Just a matter of time I suppose.


    I just noticed it on this video posted this week:

    https://youtu.be/bcAF-ZJfbGg
    Updated 12-22-2020 at 01:38 PM by Rodgeman
  13. Davidus1's Avatar
    Thanks for this review. Given that these horns are in production it would be great to hear your thoughts on the production models. Its nice to have a variety of choices.
  14. notaverygoodname's Avatar
    Well, it's not a C instrument because it's in 9' Bb, not 8' C. Unless you have a Euphonium in 8' C. That's a thing.

    Ok, I don't actually want to type out a long and pedantic rant because a lot has already been said, but seriously. Brass instruments are historically based around the idea of reading transposed treble clef. Good luck reading concert pitch music on a natural instrument with key changes. If you can't hum every note with perfect pitch off the page, forget playing it. Another historically common thing...transposing on the fly. It's so easy, even I can do a little bit of it. Can't read anything but treble clef to save my life, but I can read C music on a Bb instrument with some practice. On the Trombone side of things, you have an alto instrument with a 25mm cup diameter and more ledger lines above the scale than the scale has lines. Really not selling me on this multiple C clefs idea.

    The way an instrument reads music can be treated as arbitrary. What we have now is what we'll have tomorrow and it works quite fine as is.
  15. davewerden's Avatar
    tonewheeler: you folks with the 5050's are special! I noticed that the Cronkhite site has one model that fits that horn, and the original model that fits everything else.

    I did not know about the lining, but that is a great feature. My current horn is not silver plated, but who knows what the future will bring.
  16. tonewheeler's Avatar
    I have a leather Cronkhite purchased several years ago. I was told it was specially made to fit the girth of my Miraphone 5050. Additionally, it has a lining which prevents tarnishing. I've never experienced any issues with it and it keeps my horn well protected.
  17. highpitch's Avatar
    My Bonna was made for a New Standard, it just fits the overall length and diameter without any bolsters. I was really lucky for find that model.

    You're right, a fellow player has a full size one and it is bulkier.

    DG
  18. daruby's Avatar
    I actually have two Conkhite's, a black cordura and a brown leather bag. My Sterling goes in the cordura bag and my Adams in the leather. Part of the reason for this pairing is my Sterling is silver plated while the Adams is in lacquer. I have experienced more rapid tarnishing in the leather bag, ergo the Sterling goes in the cordura.

    I also have a Bonna case that came with my Adams. Due to the different dimensions of my Prototype E3 (it is slightly longer than a standard E3), it will not fit in the Bonna without custom cutting of the foam bolster for the bottom bow. Plus, it is MUCH larger, heavier and awkward to carry than the Cronkhites. So it is a closet queen along with the original Besson-style hard case the Sterling came in.

    Doug
  19. highpitch's Avatar
    Good review, Dave. I too carried an Altieri for many years.

    I gave a real hard look at the leather Cronkhite, Altieri, and the Bonna.

    The Bonna won out, and I'm very pleased with it.

    Dennis
  20. Liuto's Avatar
    Being a novice euph player with a strong background of singing bass in a choir, bass clef is the obvious choice for me. Feels completely natural to me.
    I also can easily play untransposed treble clef without too much of trouble (very useful to play Lieder).
    Finally, I sort of learned to play in Bb treble clef because my teacher is a trumpet player and has lots of his stuff in Bb treble clef. I am a lot slower reading TC, but I would like to play it fluently. Main advantage: it is just like tenor clef with a few different accidentals which opens access to lots of trombone parts.
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